Women in Leadership Forum | Claremont Graduate University and Sotheby’s Institute of Art

Women in Leadership Forum | Claremont Graduate University and Sotheby’s Institute of Art


– What a delight to be here tonight with you in Southern California. I live in Santa Fe, New Mexico, now. I left this morning, mid
morning, amid a snowstorm. Wild winds. When the plane was sitting on
the tarmac, it was rocking, to give you an idea of
what the wind was like. Landing in Southern
California was like wow! It’s nice here, and the sun’s out, but I do love Santa Fe,
for many many reasons, but what I want to do, before I ask our panel
to, engage our panel, I want to set the stage
for what we’re going to do. We’re going to focus
first on their stories and what themes in their life have brought them to where they are now, and the life experiences
that have connected as a result of their
different experiences, again, to bring them where they are now, and then we’re gonna take a little break and we’ll come back and
do a little dialogue about what it takes to raise funds, money. Getting the green stuff in the door, and having enough to operate
your organization with, whatever your organization is. We’ll have a little
fun with that, I think, and then close off with a dialogue about what’s happening in our environment today in terms of the political and budgetary influences on the arts, and what should we as leaders in the arts, and in philanthropy, as
well as in this world, where we want to build a culture that has depth, meaning, and
respects every individual and the gifts that they bring. How do we preserve that? What do we do as leaders
in the field of art, as well as leaders in whatever community that we’re a part of to make sure that all of those things
that are important to us, and important to us as a
people and a nation, continue. Starting off, I started my doctoral work looking at adult development, because I was intrigued
with the models that existed about how do we develop as individuals? So much of psychology is built
around child development, and just as in the medical field, there was an assumption that everything, all of the tests that occurred with men would apply to women, which was erroneous. The same thing goes for adult development. What’s happening with children in the stages that are
predictable for children, aren’t necessarily predictable for individuals in their adult lives, and I particularly looked at what are the things we need to do to renew ourselves, number one, and secondly, how do we connect the dots as we move through our life? My metaphor is a slinky, and that is that life is this series of interconnected circles. That we have chapters, and that most of you are in
early chapters of your life, and I can assure you that there
are many chapters to come, and that each one of your chapters, you squeeze out of that chapter, what do I have to learn from that? What is the dominant theme that is maybe a life theme for me as I move through my life? As I reflected on my life, the life themes that were important to me that I consistently had
seen through my life, are leadership, education, and community. I can see all those pieces coming together in terms of everything I did. Having said this, and brought my slinky. It’s not one of those fun ones that’s a tiger or a lion or something. It’s a pretty straightforward slinky, but life does have its quality
of expanding and contracting, just like a slinky, but we’ve got these connective chapters. What I want to talk with
our women leaders about are first of all, what major theme, or a significant theme
or themes in your life, and how has that theme or those themes, connected as you move through life, and tell us what those
life chapters felt like, and how you’ve developed to where you are. Now having said that, I want to get something
out of the way first. I’m gonna ask Katharine first, Kathy. You heard what she does, and she was backstage at
the Oscar’s on Sunday night, and she was sending me texts and pictures of this thing and that thing, but I want you to connect that. You can give us a little story, but also connect that to
one piece of your life, and then backtrack, and you know which piece of
your life I’m talking about. – I’m sure I do. I’m sure I know which piece
I’m supposed to talk about. I was not backstage,
but I was in the house. I started this slightly wacky new job at the academy museum, which is being built on the corner of Fairfax and Wilshire, just
right down the road here, in November, and we’re
talking about themes. A theme in my life would
be a passion for the arts and a passion for creativity, and a passion for supporting artists, and also another big thread, I think for all of us, is raising money, and being comfortable raising money. The job that I had before this job, was I got invited by the presidents of the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations to start an organization called United States Artists, and United States Artists gives 50 artists a year, $50,000 each, and I was there for eight years. I got it off the ground. I started a crowdfunding site for artists called USA Projects. Total blast, really loved it. It was a fantastic experience, and one of the artists who got
our grant, was Barry Jenkins, who won for Moonlight, and I saw Barry. The outside world sees
the Oscar’s as one night, but what it really is like
six months of this slog that these people have
to go to for the awards. It’s this endless slog of this event and that event and this celebration and that competition. It’s so much work. It starts in the fall
with something called The Governor’s Awards. All these folks who are contenders go to this event called
The Governor’s Awards, and Barry just happened to
be at the table next to mine. I kind of slid over and
this whole cast was there, and I’d just seen the movie, and it was just beginning
to get a little bit of buzz, and I reintroduced myself. I don’t know if you remember me, but I’m Katharine DeShaw, and I’ve ran United States Artists. Oh my gosh, yes, of course I remember you! He said, you gave me that $50,000 grant. I used it to make the movie. – [Sarah] Isn’t that awesome? – I was like, oh man! – Isn’t that awesome? Talk about connectivity! – It’s really cool, and he’s the second person
who won an Academy Award. The first was Laura Poitras’, who won for Citizen Four, but USA was very much about funding women artists,
funding artists of color. It was this incredible thing. I was secretly secretly cheering him on, and then sitting there in
the back of that theater, and watching that, like crazy moment, last Sunday night, and it was beautiful in a way, because they all knew each other. Because they’ve been to all these award ceremonies for so many months. This time you’re getting this award. Now it’s our turn to get that award. They all knew each other, and I think the grace that was shown on the stage that night is very indicative of people who’ve gotten
to know each other. People who work really hard. Artists who are struggling
every single day to get their work shown, and
on stages, and in theaters. I guess that’s my story and my theme. – Go back, let’s go back. – Now I have to go back to
what she wants me to say. – Go back a couple of chapters. How did you end up? Because you didn’t start in the arts. – I kind of did. – You had as part of a life theme, right? – I grew up in Duluth, Minnesota. – It’s cold there. – It’s cold there. It’s cold there right now, I’m sure. I keep the weather on my phone for Duluth. My experience in Duluth, was like so many folks, particularly of our generation, went to public schools. The public schools were great, and we had fantastic arts programs, and anything you wanted to do in the arts was available to you. You didn’t even think about it. You could take dance, you could sing. You could paint, you could do ceramics. You could tell stories, you could draw. It was just part of every
day life for us as children, and then as I moved into my career, one of the first jobs I got was running a little dance company in Chicago, and I didn’t know a Martha
Graham from a Graham Bothma. It was like, what do you know about dance? I’m like, not a lot. Well, we need a company manager, what do you know about managing? Never really done that. The lady was like, I like you, I’m gonna hire you, and she just took this blind leap of faith in this kid from Duluth, Minnesota. I gotta be honest, but it was that, and I think all of us have
done that in our lives, where we’ve just seen a spark in somebody and said, you’re the girl for me. Thus began my career
in dance, and I worked. I studied dance when I was
running this little company, called the Chicago Moving Company, and eventually ended up In New York. I work for a choreographer probably the most famous choreographer in the world at that time, Twyla Tharp. Worked for the Tharp Company. They went on the road. I helped book them on tours. I did two books of Richard Avedon. I helped produce the company on Broadway. 24 years old. Like what do I know about Broadway? I was just thrown into
these crazy situations, and just kind of like kept rolling, but really the left turn
that my life took was a lot of the dancers started dying. This was the 80s in New York and the arts community
was devastated by AIDs. I had worked in dance for awhile, and then I had this funny little left turn where I was working at the
Multiple Sclerosis Society. It was a career advancement thing for me. More money. Running, fun, big, special events, and then all these people start dying, and I have this weird double
major, arts and health, and I was approached by
the Gay Men’s Health Crisis which was and still is the largest AIDs organization in New York City, and invited to be their
head of development, and that was the crazy left turn, the really hard left turn, really interesting, and what I found was, things I’d learned working
in a disease organization, I could bring to this organization. Things I’d learned working in the arts, I could bring to this organization, and so I’ve moved in and out of the arts. I’ve consulted in environmental issues, public radio, anti-recidivism coalition, has been a recent client of mine. I’ve had this weird funny career but it always comes back to the arts, and the power of creativity, and I had my own little
fun victory celebration on Sunday night with Barry. That was a full circle thing. I will stop talking. – Wow! That was great. Nice story. You can see the slinky effect, right? Susan. – I also have come to fundraising in a not traditional way, and I started my career as an attorney. I actually was a litigator with a big firm here in Los Angeles, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, and I did that for 17 years, but along the way that whole time that I was litigating and raising
a family, and pretty busy, I was passionate about music and about specifically choral music which was something I was exposed
to while I was in college. Starting my last year of high school. I am to this day, 37 years later, still a volunteer choral singer. I sing in two community choruses, and I’m on the board of the
Los Angeles Master Chorale, which is our professional chorus, and also on the board of the national, actually U.S. and Canada
support organization for choruses which is
called, big surprise, Chorus America. How did I go from being a lawyer to working for the L.A. Phil? The chapter analogy is a good one. My first chapter, I would say, being a volunteer, board
member involved with the arts, learning a bit about how
arts organizations survive. How they are funded. What makes them go. How projects get started. From the standpoint of
being a board member wanting your organization to succeed. That was while I was at
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher. Then I left my partnership
at Gibson, Dunn, and went to your
friendly, now independent, public media station, KCET, which at that point was the
West Coast flagship PBS station as their general counsel, and that was a move from being a lawyer with lots of clients, to a lawyer with one client, but very early on in my career at KCET, my boss, the CEO, said to
each of the senior executives, you really need to be helping us with a revenue function, and he said to me, not
unlike what you said, he said, I think you’d be really great raising money from foundations, and I said, huh? He said, no, no, no. He said, it’s a lot of writing, and it’s a lot of deadlines, and you lawyers are really
good at writing and deadlines. You’ll be great! You’ll do a great job at that! All of those things were true. What was also true was that it was very much about building trust and building relationships, and making sure that these
mostly private foundations, but also government and
small family foundations, that they trusted that we
were going to use their money the way they wanted it used, and that we would do a good job with it. I did the foundation fundraising for I would say about six years, and along the way I learned a lot about fundraising in general. Specifically, I learned a lot about, among other things, the thing I do now, which is planned giving. That’s a long story, which
I won’t go into, but. Pardon me? Oh okay, planned giving, for those of you who are not familiar with it, is gifts that are left
through your will or trust that benefit an organization. Being a lawyer is actually
a really good thing for planned giving, because you’re talking to people about their wills, their trusts, and in many instances more complicated types of trusts that allow you to leave a legacy for a charity, and in some instances will provide you with income during your life, and in some instances will
provide the charity with income, and then your family later on. I went from being the
general counsel at KCET, to fast forward to January 1, of 2011. For those of you who are
not familiar with that day, KCET left PBS, was no
longer a PBS member station, and became the largest independent
public media organization in the United States, and at that point my boss
again came to me and said, you know, I’m gonna be
reorganizing my executive team, and I think you’d do a really great job being in charge of all of our development, and I want to have a
chief development officer, and I would like you to be that person, and I went, really? I said, I’m a lawyer! How is that going to work? He said, no, no, no. He said, I know you can do this job. He had confidence, and I said okay, I’ll try it, and it was like drinking
water out of a fire hose. I had two years, seriously. I had two years of leaving all of the fundraising for KCET, during
a period of immense change, during a period in which there were many questions being asked about this decision to become an independent public media station. It was very important for me to be a voice that people would trust, and to be totally
committed to the new KCET. Now we get to the third
chapter of my life. KCET, there was a natural
breaking point for me to leave KCET which is they merged with another public media organization, and it was pretty clear to me that it would be good for them to have a new development leader who was committed to the new organization. I stepped away. I had some personal things
going on in my life. I had a parent who was dying, and family that really needed me, and I took some time off. I did a little bit of consulting, and then I thought about what do I want my third chapter to be? I kept coming back to music. Music was the thing that
was my anchor to windward, my solace, my support, during my entire life, and during this very difficult time that I went through
watching my dad die slowly. I heard that the L.A. Phil was going to be really launching a major initiative around planned giving, and that they really
were looking for a leader who would come in and build a program, and take it to the next level, which sounded pretty exciting to me. That’s the work I’m engaged in now, and it’s really an amazing place to work. It is an incredible organization from top to bottom, and that’s my third chapter. – Great. So far you can see all these connections, that really is rooted in the theme a life theme that developed
very early in your lives. Jane. Jane’s life has been full, and she’s done many things. Many things. Talk to us about your evolution, but primarily that theme that is the connecting theme in your life. – I grew up in England, post World War II, and growing up in a zone
that has been a war zone, where you remember planes flying over and hiding under the desk, in case the bomb dropped on you. I’m not quite sure what
they thought in school, the bombs were going to do
to us with the desks, but. (audience laughing) It seemed safe at the time. It obviously worked. I too went to British public schools which were very stratified, and won a scholarship to a school with a very smart green uniform, and when I was 12 years old, I realized that this school, like the public schools you’re describing, one could do all kinds of things. One could paint, and go to
acting classes, and sing, and I signed up to be in the school play. Now you understand this
was an all girls school. I was always the tallest in my class, and always had a relatively
deep voice for a girl. I came home from my first art class and said to my mother very proudly, Mom, I’ve decided what I’m
going to do when I grow up. I’m going to be a painter. My father had died at the end of the war. My mother ran a small
hotel, with two daughters, and supported all of us, and she said, that’s nice dear. That’s for Sundays. (audience laughing) Two years later, I come home, and I said, now I’ve really understood it. I’m going to be an actor, because by now I had been
the lead in the school play, the boy lead you understand. I had only, in all the years I acted, only ever played the male parts, and my mother just smiled indulgently. By the time I was 16 I was directing plays and we were winning some prizes. Now I knew that I’d finally grown up. I came home and said I am going to be a theater director, and if you could only understand how that must have sat in an England where you wore clothes handed down by seven generations of girls, where you used every
pencil to the last inch, where you wrote on
every side of the paper, where you grew your own food, because we were on rationing for the first 14 years of my life. There was not a lot around you, and for me art, painting, visual art, performing arts, reading, was my solace. It was a way to enter another world. I fell madly in love, at the age of 11, with Hieronymus Bosch, and for you who don’t
know Hieronymus Boschis I’m sure everyone in this room does, I was totally stunned by being inside one of those paintings. I did move on to El Greco. (audience laughing) I went to university, and the university I went to had a theater, a newly built theater, built by a very generous donor, and I knew that if I’d
went inside that theater I would never ever finish my degree. I would be a lost soul. In all the years I was in college, I literally never stepped inside it until my very last day. My last term in college,
someone came to me, and I say this right from the beginning. I do not consider myself
to be a fundraiser at all and looking back as we
had this conversation, I’d clearly been raising
money my entire life. – That’s right, that’s true. – Someone came to me and said, how would you like to go to New York? You must understand that
no one got on airplanes. People didn’t own suitcase. An airplane? Really? An airplane to go to America? Was very far away. I said I would love to go to New York. They said, okay, I bet you you can’t sell all the seats in a big airplane to the students in this university to go to New York. I said, what do I get if I do? They said, a ticket to New
York, and four days in the Y. I said, done. Don’t ask me why I actually
thought I could do it. I have no idea why I thought I could sell 300 plane tickets, when I didn’t even know what a plane was. I got on the plane, came to New York, and that is a whole saga. I arrived in New York. I had been in the English Peace Corps in the jungle in Malaya, which was may I say the forerunner of the American Peace Corps., and thought I was terribly sheek. I took all of my saved money, and I sent it by wire
to the bank in New York. When I arrived they didn’t have it. They couldn’t find it, and I had $20. Now, if I call my mom, and say, Mom I don’t have any money. She’ll say get on the plane and come home, because she had this terrible feeling that I was going to come to America and never go back, and she was right. I went to the bus station. It was terribly hot in New York, much hotter than the jungle, and I said, where is it cool? I’ve got $10. They said, Boston, Bay three. I went to Boston. I ended up getting offered a job as long I stayed a whole year. Getting married, having two children, getting divorced, in the days when if you weren’t married, by the time you were 27, you were seriously deficient, and people were terribly sorry for you. When I had my first child at 27, the doctor said I’m very worried this is an elderly birth. – How times have changed? – I had two elderly births. Still here to tell the story, as are my daughters, and I ended up getting divorced
when they were very small, when they were one and three. I thought oh my God, I now need a trade union card. I can’t be a painter or an actor because how am I going to pay the rent? Simmons college in Boston, which has been a fine all womens’ college for a very long time, became completely insane, and they took two women professors from Harvard Business School, who raised a fortune from Xerox, CBS, and the Bank in Chicago, and they opened the first
Womens’ Business School. All women, only women. I had friends at Harvard at the time, including the Dean of the business school, who said to me oh for God sakes, come to Harvard, don’t go there. But he put me through
the interview process and all the young men
who did peer interviews, said to me, don’t come here, nobody will talk to you. By the way, can I get a job in the consulting company
you’re working in now? I was so angry and distressed that I got in my car and went
across the river to Simmons where they accepted me, God knows why, and there I was. We were told our first day that CBS and the Bank of Chicago and Xerox would hire the top three
students in the class. I was in a class with women of all ages. The eldest student was 84. – [Sarah] Cool. – The average age was
30 something, 34, 35. Most of these women had had careers. It was at a time when women were a subset. Life has changed a lot, but we have a way to go. I was determined that I was going to be one of those people even though half the class had PhDs. I’m not an academic, but I was determined that I was going to get that CBS job. I think I thought they
might let me be an actor, or maybe they’d let me
do something creative, and so when I finally got that job at CBS, I arrived at CBS in New York, and they put me in this huge
room with all these guys, and I said what am I doing here, and they said, you’re a financial analyst. I said, I can’t do math. I’m not even good at counting. They said you have an MBA in finance. I said, well yes, but
that was a one time thing. (audience laughing) They said, well what are you good at? They looked at me, and they said, well you look like you
should be in television. That was why they hired me. A law had just been passed where you had to have women
in middle management. Trust me they would never have hired me under any other circumstance, and I ended up writing speeches
for the president of CBS and I went on to have
a career in television. I worked mostly in movies of the week. CBS, NBC. I literally talked my way into it, because I was desperate
somebody would find out that I literally couldn’t add. Balance sheets were terrifying. I got hired by Time, Inc., who had started this
new company called HBO, and it was in the days when HBO was doing boxing matches in Vegas, and taping live plays on the stage and putting them on television, and had eight million people watching it over the course of a year. When I was an MBC, every morning on my chair, there was taped to the back of my chair, the numbers for the movie
I’d made the night before, on that chair, and if it didn’t
say 58 million or higher, your job was gone. Those jobs completely depended on you reaching one third
of the American audience which in those days was
about 250 million people, and here I am in this startup company with most of the people that I worked with in Hollywood saying to me, are you insane? You have a career. You could run one of
these companies one day. I didn’t believe them, trust me. No woman in those days had
actually run a company. Sherry Lansing was the first person to ever have one of those jobs. I’m at HBO, and the chairman of the board said to me, we’d like to make small features. We don’t want to look
like television movies, and I said, well you need
some money to do that. No, we only have the same budget as all the other companies. We just want you to make features. Why don’t you go to L.A. We’ll give you an assistant
and a credit card, and an office, and you
see what you can do. We created HBO films, and the very first year, nobody knew what to do. Certainly nobody imagined that Elizabeth Taylor would make our very first movie with Carol Burnett called Between Friends, and it was the very first time vulva, had ever been said aloud
on American television. (audience laughing) Faced with, we want you to build, and they didn’t say we want you to build HBO films, they just said, we want you to see if you can build a business for us, and I thought it was interesting they chose a woman executive to do it, because if it failed women executives could be replaced, and they were not going to risk one of their up and coming young male executives to do it. Needless to say we were
incredibly successful, but a part of that was
Jane, go find the money. I thought, this is a
recurring theme in my life. I literally got on a plane
and went round the world. I had a yellow pad. I had an American Express
card, and no cell phone, and I would just land in cities where I knew one person, and I would call them, and then I’d call the next person, and then I’d call the next person, and then I’d call the next person, until one day I’m in the South of France, in the Hotel du Cap, and it was the film festival, had just been over, and I’m swimming laps in the morning, which I did for sanity, and then a man in a
raincoat was sitting there, and he sat there, and every time I looked up
he was still sitting there. There was not another soul. It was raining as I remember. I finally get out of the pool, and this man comes over to me and says, my name is, I’m an Israeli. I have Canadian citizenship. I love that film you made about Sacharoff and by sheer chance this
is a Russian physicist, who was in the Gulag for
many many many years, the day that we showed the film. The Russians out of nowhere, released him. The film took off, and this man was a very wealthy investor in American and Canadian companies, and he said I’ll give
you $20 million dollars if you go on making films like this. Not bad. It was a big gift, and it was long time ago. I became very good at asking for people to help make my dreams come true and I think if I have to say if there is anything in my life that has allowed me to be ballsy flat out and asking people for something, I have no idea they had, or I did have an idea they had, and I just wanted it, it was because I had a vision and a mission for something
I wanted to accomplish. Sometimes personal, sometimes
in terms of my career, and here I am a very old woman at the Broad Stage at a time when in this country, if
we don’t keep art alive, we are going to die as a nation, and that can’t happen. Now my job instead of being
the executive director of a performing arts center, it is I’m back in my early feminist days of being an early feminist who is now I hope part of the vision to save our world through art. – Wonderful. The three of you are awesome. (audience applause) We are going to get to that later, and what we need to do on that, but I’d like to go back to Katharine. Well first of all Jane,
I saw a clear connection, from what you wanted to do as a child. That you kept making announcements to your mother about
what you wanted to do, and it all came together. Yeah, isn’t it wonderful? It’s like be careful of
what you wish for, right? It happens. Or who you say? The other thing that’s fascinating about all three of them, although Katharine is probably more clear about her fundraising
capacities and what she’s done, but both Susan and Jane said, I don’t know if we want
to talk about fundraising, or I don’t know if I’m
really a fundraiser. Excuse me. Did you hear anything coming out of their mouths that indicated that they weren’t fundraisers? But there were a couple of
things that you did say, and it was in a way that Katharine and I, we’re old friends, so I know Katharine, and I’ve just gotten
to know Susan and Jane, but how critically
important relationships are. How critically important
relationships are. I’d like to go back to Katharine, because one of my first
interactions with Katharine was when she was about to launch United States Artists, and I’d like you to talk
about how you did that. How you brought together
the kinds of things that both Jane and
Susan have talked about, in terms of skill sets, and then advance that idea. I’ll never forget the energy that you brought to the classroom. That’s where we also worked
is the classroom together. – Sarah and I have been, we’ve team taught classes
out at Clairemont, and Drucker and Kravitz, at CGU. It’s like the alphabet soup out there, and now I teach for GLI, the Getty Leadership Institute. I’m probably gonna start working a bit with the
Sothebys Institute as well, which is really fun. My career has been this crazy trajectory. I went to Colorado College. Ended up in Chicago. Chicago led me to Washington to a fellowship at the National
Endowment for the Arts. I ended up in New York. Lived and worked there for 12 years. Then went back to Minnesota to work at the Walker
Arts Center in Minneapolis for eight very happy years, and then came out to L.A. to head the development at LACMA. Literally ping ponging
my way around the country working in the arts,
working out of the arts. Sliding around, but you end up connecting
with certain people who stick with you along the way, and I had this amazing call one day where a head hunter who I’d known called and just said, the presidents of the Ford
and Rockefeller foundations are putting many millions of dollars down to support artists and
you’ve been a fundraiser and a grant maker, and we want to talk to you about that. I said, what’s a grant maker? What kind of term is that? I was at the time running
a small family foundation which we’ve talked a little bit for Leonard Nimoy, and Susan Nimoy, which was a total blast, and anyone who asked me I say, he was indeed the nicest
man in the universe. Truly an incredible spirit, and an incredibly generous human being, and the two of them together were a dynamic duo in philanthropy. I worked with them and
created a small program where we were funding artists residencies in visual arts institutions
around the United States, and Leonard would say, well are we getting the biggest
bang for the buck, Kathy? I’d say, well you put two
million dollars into this thing and you funded 700 artist projects all around the country. What do you think? He’s like okay we’re doing a good job. He was always a big enthusiast about that. Now I’m a fundraiser
and I’m a grant maker. Okay, yeah, so go on. She said, we’re starting this organization to support artists. – How much did they start with? – 22 million. It was again, I think if
there was a theme in my life, it’s just interesting
opportunities come your way, and it’s like, just do it. It’s like I have no idea
how to run a dance company. I have no idea how to run a foundation. Sure I can do that! What’s to stop you? Stupider people than me do
this stuff every day, right? I just figure, whatever. I go on this interview, and I’m really not. I’m way outside the box. They’ve been interviewing
foundation people with very serious credibility
in the foundation world, and I got up there and I had a
little time to think about it and I said, you know, if I
had money to give to artists, I’d give 50 artists a year, $50,000 each, in all fields and all disciplines and I’d raise $50 million dollars to make it a permanent
endowment to fund it forever. That’s what I’d do. I have friends who live in this city in this city, in this city. They drew this big map
of the United States. I know a lot of people who I think would care about this program. They hired me. Which was kind of crazy. Then we just hit the ground running. We based it in L.A. I wasn’t going to leave Los Angeles. I was living here, and I
was very clear about that. It wouldn’t be in New York. It would be in L.A. We created a brand that was very much a Southern California brand. I wanted Southern California arts leaders to be very active in making the selection for who those winners would be, and we had done a bunch of research. I think probably there’s
a theme emerging as well. I imagine from all of
us, which is research. What is the topic? What do you need to know about it? Learn as much as you can, before you make any big decisions, and research is a huge part of the work we do as donors. Who are our donors? What do we need to know about them, before we get in front of them? The more you know, the more quickly you can develop a rapport. In terms of research, I looked across the country, and I’d done research on all these fellowship programs. Actually for Susan and Leonard who originally wanted to
start a fellowship program. I was this weird little
defacto expert in this stuff. If you drew a line down
the center of the country, all the money that went
to artist fellowships that were called national went to artists in the
Eastern United States. I was like, okay, that’s really not good. When I did my pitch to create what became United States Artists, I said we’re going to
have as much of the money going East of the Mississippi,
as West of the Mississippi, and that’s gonna be a
big focus of our work. Everything we did, every decision we made, panelists that we put together,
to select the artists, the people who nominated the artists, came from both sides of the country and Alaska and Hawaii. Ultimately Puerto Rico, and so it was just let’s create
this truly national program and after eight years of running it, we really were a national program. We did have as many artists on each side and it was a really fun thing, but what I got to do was, tap into all of those relationships I’d built over time, and tap into the
relationships of our board. We were founded by the
four presidents, all women. Presidents Ford, Rockefeller, The Rasmuson Foundation in Alaska, and the Prudential Foundation
based in New Jersey. All four women, super clear, gave me the money, get rolling. Let’s just do this thing. Then they opened up
their rolodexes for us. Susan Berresford, President
of the Ford foundation was close friends with Mike Bloomberg. That’s a good guy to know. Bloomberg gave us a million
dollars to get out the door. I wanted to make sure that we had a big stake in Southern California. The first person I went to is Eli Broad. I met Eli through my work at LACMA. I pitched him. He gave us a million dollars. You start at that top level and that sets a bar for
a brand new organization. We did that all across the country, and built a very strong geographic balance of wealthy people who care
about artists across the country and that was how we got it started. – I have one thing that I
want you to tell us about, because I think it’s critical, and I think each one of you have a different experience, or a similar experience around this, and that is how did you help donors, understand and appreciate the
value of their contribution? What did you create for them that was a lasting indicator
and memory, so to speak, of their contribution to a particular artist or set of artists? – Every single one of
those 50 fellowships, were available to be named. You could have a USA Smith fellow. Smith or a fellow in music. I was matchmaking a lot. That was a lot of the
work that I was doing. One of the weird facts I learned was just in terms of thinking about the arts, you have people who love the arts. Big group of people who love the arts. They love the history of the arts. They care about symphonies, and they care about the history of theater and they care about the
history of the visual arts. That’s the biggest subsector
of philanthropy in the arts. Then you have a smaller subsector. People who care about contemporary art. They fund Mocha, or they might fund contemporary
theater at the Broad, or they might fund contemporary symphonies at the L.A. Phil harmonic. Smaller, even smaller, tiny, tiny group. People who care about artists. As I traveled around the country, I had to figure out in each community who really cared about artists. It took me some time to figure that out. Then it was what kind of art and artists do they care about? Then begin the matchmaking. I met people who loved
commissioning new symphonies. Got them engaged with funding
work in our music fellowships and naming those artists. What I would try to do is, not only make the connection
to what they cared about, but then once that artist got named, introduce them, make that connection. The Barry Jenkins story
is a perfect story. A couple out of Omaha,
Nebraska, loved film. Paul and Nancy Smith, and Paul funded a fellowship. Smith Fellow, and that was
the Barry Jenkins fellowship. They met at Telluride just this last year, reconnected after I had introduced them and Barry was like I’ve used
your money to make this movie and I really hope it’s gonna go somewhere. Of course, you could imagine, probably some of the happiest people on Sunday night were the
Smiths in Omaha, Nebraska. I wanted to make those
permanent connections, and great things came of that, and I think in many cases
long lasting relationships came of that and those artists are still connected to those donors. That’s one of a million examples. – Tell us quickly how you
recognized those donors. What was your gift to them? – The biggest donors. Prompt me. I’m brain dead after wearing
high heels for three weeks. It’s just been killer. I gotta tell you I’m so happy to be in shoes that are comfortable. I did this thing called
the Modern Medici programs. If you gave our organization
a million dollars, you are what I called a Modern Medici, and a million dollars funded
20 of our fellowships. Eli Broad, over five years,
funded 20 fellowships. What I would do is have a photograph taken of the donor with the
artist they had supported and these were in amazing locations. For instance, Michael Bloomberg had just opened his philanthropy
headquarters in New York and he had this beautiful outdoor garden on the top floor of this
fabulous arts building on the upper east side. We did this beautiful photograph of like 50 artists that
Bloomberg had funded, and there’s the mayor of New York standing in the middle
of this group of artists, hosting a cocktail party. Again, connecting, getting to know them. All the artists he funded
were from New York City so that was kind of cool. All the way up to a couple up in Sonoma. Steven and Nancy Oliver. Big supporters of the
visual arts up there, and they had built this
amazing tower on their property actually for performing
artists to perform in, but it was designed by a visual
artist named Anne Hamilton. We set up a photograph of
this amazing photographer of them walking through this tower with some of the artists they had funded, and then what we would do is present it. Frame the photograph beautifully and present the photograph to the donor to thank them for their support, and then we made a portfolio of all the members of the Modern Medici and every time a new photo, we sent them to the donors, and every time a new photograph came, we’d add it, and we’d
send it to all the donors to say add this to your
Modern Medici portfolio, because I want it to be on
their coffee table year round. Just making those connections and being present in the donor’s life. – The album was spectacular. It was a beautiful beautiful album. Just in terms of connecting dots, of how you provide that
kind of recognition and level of engagement. Susan, you were about to say something. – I love your story about ways to tailor what in
the development world we call stewardship, and recognition to what is important to the donor. I guess one story I would tell is, I recently had a situation in which we created a beautiful framed work that was pictures of
all the different places that the L.A. Phil has
performed over its history. We’re coming up on our centennial so we’re getting pretty
excited about this, but I was working with a couple, who were in their 90s, and they had actually
gone to the Phil Harmonic at all of these locations, over the course of
their very long marriage and it was a very meaningful gift to them, because it brought back
all those memories, and a lot of what you do in gift planning, is you’re working with people toward the end of their life, many times. It can be earlier, but it tends to be, toward the end of their life, and they’re thinking about what we love to call legacy. They’re thinking about what do I want to leave behind after I’m gone? What you really do is
you tap into memories. You tap into listening for what was important to them, that has connected them
to your organization, and this particular thing that we created for them was very meaningful and when the husband passed away, it’s still in the house. When you go to visit the wife, you see that she still
has it hanging there. We also have many people who
like to commission works, and the L.A. Phil commissions
a lot of new work, and whenever one of our donors does that, we oftentimes will have a piece from the music that’s been
signed by the composer, and is initialed to them. It’s written to them. Those are all very nice
ways of stewarding people. The other thing that we
do a lot in planned giving is we create what are
called legacy societies. If people tell us that they’ve left a gift in their will or their trust, we add them to the roster of people who have done that, and we publish that list. Legacy societies, they have
all kinds of different names. Ours is named after our founder, and we have an annual luncheon, in which we feature one of our musicians, and people get to come
and hear that musician talk about their journey, and they’re often these wonderful stories about how they’ve devoted
their life to music and how they came to be
musicians in the first place. They’ll talk about their parents. Sometimes there are young performers who will say my mom really wanted me to be a doctor, and I kept saying, no I really want to be a violinist, and finally when I got to
play with the L.A. Phil, my mom said yeah I think it’s
okay that you’re a violinist and not a doctor. It’s stories like that, and people who have long
associations with us and who have decided to
leave these kind of gifts, they love hearing those stories, so you provide them an opportunity, not only to be with
people who are like them, who want to leave this kind of a gift, but also to hear our musicians, to see the impact of what
that gift is gonna be, and hear them talk about how important it is to them, that the orchestra is on a
good footing financially. – I’d like to introduce myself. My name is Mrs. Gotrocks. I was recently widowed, and I have several adult children. One of my childrens’ children had a serious medical issue, so I made a pretty significant contribution to a local
hospital where he was treated and in fact it was a wing of a hospital, but they were wonderful. They really took care of my grandson, but I also love art. I love to collect art. I recently had the opportunity and I love the southwest, and I love Georgia O’Keeffe, and I love the Georgia O’Keeffe museum, and it’s fabulous and I love that country. It’s like oh my Lord,
what a beautiful land! I bought a Georgia O’Keeffe. I have a Georgia O’Keeffe
to add to my collection, and I like to travel. I like to have a good time, and I also have made a
contribution in my husband’s name at a local university where he enjoyed a short term
of working with them and building up business school. I started a scholarship
program in his name. There’s something more to life, and I want to do something different. I let this friend of mine. She does something in the arts. I don’t know what she does. But I met her recently and she had this great personality, and I thought Kathy DeShaw. I invited her over and I just want to hear from her about what’s important
and what she’s doing and maybe think about what
I want to do in the arts. – Take a pause. Have a seat Mrs. Gotrocks, please. Don’t fall. We need you around. People get thrown in
front of us all the time, and someone called me today and wants to introduce
me to General Electric. Great, General Electric, fantastic! Well Thomas Edison, did
invent the lightbulb, and he was involved in the movie industry. Yeah, and we’re featuring
him in the museum. Yeah, G.E. bring it on, right. Everyone has these connections that can be really fun
and meaningful for us and can be helpful to our organization. Mrs. Gotrocks has connected with me. She’s interested in the arts. I know this about her, but before we talk to her, I’ve gotta do my homework, and this is where prospect
research comes in, and how many of you know
that term, prospect research? You ever heard that? That’s good. It’s something that really the hospitals and universities do all
the time, magically. It’s a history of those institutions. The minute you graduate
you become an alumni and trust me you’re on the
list of the development office, and trust me if your family has money or you’re making money they know it, and the reason they know it, is because they have prospect researchers who are constantly learning
this information about people. From her introduction we
know a little bit about her. We know she cares about the arts. We know she cares about
collecting visual arts. She loves the Southwest. She supported a hospital. She cares about kids obviously. Has grandkids and children. Cares about education. Those are a lot of broad categories here. Now we have to do a little bit of digging, and what are we trying to find out? Well, we’re trying to
find out more about her. What were the level of
gifts that she made? What kind of church does she belong to? What school did she go to? What are some of the threads that have gone through her life that can connect with what I’m trying to connect her to, and let me then toss
it over here to Susan. – I was gonna say also, the other thing we’d
want to try and know is who are her cohort of friends, and are any of those friends, affiliated with our organization? Because oftentimes in addition to having one of us, a professional staff person, be involved in fundraising, you would also hopefully enlist a board member, or a friend,
to be the door opener, to having a conversation and relationship. – What kind of clubs does she belong to? Is she golfer? – I’m not a club person. – No clubs, huh? – I hate clubs! – I spent too many years
doing disco dancing! – I just don’t want to be stuck in these old ladies’ clubs. – Exactly, exactly, exactly. We know that she’s a
little self indulgent. – Oh no! – Fabulous darling! Never looked better! We have to think about
the approach to her. We’ve done our homework. We know a little bit more about her. We’ve invited a good friend
to come along on a call who has a personal relationship with her. – Maybe we’ve also found
out that you like parties. Do you like parties? – I like to have a good time. – We think about what is the thing we’re going to introduce
you to right off the bat? To convince you that our organization is really a fun place for
you to be involved with? – You know what, I also love meeting people who have
done amazing things in film. – Maybe we invite you to something where you would have an opportunity to meet those people. – There’s this woman whose got a beautiful English accent that I’d love to meet, and I think she was hooked up with HBO, or something like that. – In another life. Well, now you might like to come with me, and meet the tango dancers that are coming on Saturday evening. – Wow. – To do an extraordinary
exhibition of dancing, and I thought perhaps you
might enjoy a tango lesson in the lobby of the theater
before anyone arrives, perhaps with a bottle of
champagne to go with it. – Well, you know, my husband passed away like eight years ago. – They’re all men. (audience laughing) – Cool, cool! Tell me, tell me, tell me! I’m liking this more and more. Tell me about your theater. Where are these dancers? – The dancers are actually in the theater but they’re coming from Argentina. They’re with us for a weekend. – Love South America. – Santa Monica, is by the ocean. – Sounds heavenly. – The breeze is gorgeous. – Oh, yes! – And the wonderful outdoor patio and we thought we perhaps
would have a dance class. Just few friends with the dancers. There are 10 of them. We would start in the outside, and dance around the grass, and slide into the theater. – I like the slide part. (audience laughing) – Then perhaps afterwards, we could go backstage, and when everyone’s gone, you might try to tango with one of the dancers on the stage. – Wonderful, this sounds wonderful. Tell me about your theater though. What’s it all about? I mean, is this something that, is for public consumption? – It is a wonderfully small
performing arts center. We have two theaters. We have a 500 seat theater, and a 100 seat theater. – Wow. – One is called Black Box, which means it has no windows of any kind. It is literally a black box. Inside it we create magic. We transform worlds. In this last month we’ve had a wonderful piece of Broadway theater. Story of a woman who lost her husband, and when he died, she found out that his business world wasn’t
quite what it might have been and he left her a list of things to do that showed how he loved her. It was hilarious. It was very sad. She was wonderful in it. 80 year old actress, who just opened on Broadway
to rave reviews again. Followed by a piece of one man showmanship it was actually a piece about depression and mental health that made you sob with
laughter for two hours. The audience just were
completely involved. The young actor whose story it was, and it was actually a true story, went to several people
in the audience and said, would you be my school teacher? Can I call you at night when I can’t sleep because my mom died? She killed herself. – How sad. – Would you be my father? Would you be my brother? Would you be the girl at school that helped me with my math homework? All of a sudden you had
a room of 100 people totally and completely in the
world of this small child. It was called Every Brilliant Thing. Every day of his life, he wrote a card with a
brilliant thing on it, to take to his mom who was depressed at home in bed, to show her how wonderful life was. – Wow. – Ice cream that doesn’t melt. The dog that licks your face. – How do you do all of this? How can I help? It sounds wonderful. (audience laughing) – There are lots and lots of ways that you can help us. – Really? – There are lots of ways you can help us and we should talk about it, but you should come first, and let us just immerse you in it. – I would love it. – Then we’ll find a dozen
ways that you can help us. – Wow, I’m cooked. (audience applause) – What happened here is, she made that personal connection. She made that, you saw Sarah get engaged. You saw she talked about
a husband who died. She’d obviously known her
husband had recently died. She made connections to fun. She’s a woman who liked
to have a good time. She didn’t want to sit
around with old people. What is that connection? She also knows that women outlive men and that women are more
philanthropic than men. You always want to stay very engaged particularly with widows, because they’re often looking for new ways to connect in the world, and often have significant assets. The other very smart thing she did was, she didn’t ask her for money! She wants to make that connection. She wants to bring her close. Get her excited about the
work that’s being done. Invite her to something else. Continue to develop the relationship, bringing her closer and closer, and then there will come a moment where she’ll ask her to make a gift, and it’s probably not going to be that big of a gift to start. A lot of people think $5,000 is a really significant gift to make for a first gift to an organization, even if someone’s worth many
many millions of dollars. It’s a dance that we do, in many cases over many
many years, hopefully. – Thank you. We didn’t rehearse this, by the way. This was all very spontaneous. (audience applause) Thank you all, because we wanted to do a
little interlude, so to speak, that would be a little lively, but also have some lessons
contained within it, to get back to our chapter, and how we build out on our themes. Thank you, each one of you, for your contribution to that. We just generally talked about it in the green room and that was it. We’re good, we’re good. Now I’d like to do a wrap up with each one of us knows how
important the arts are. How important culture, and as Jane so eloquently articulated, she concluded her opening kind
of statement of who she is. We’re in this time where so many things that we value seem to be
under some kind of threat. Politically, policy wise, budget wise, and what I wanted to do is
to have a brief dialogue with each one of the three, four of us, about how do we, not survive, but thrive in this kind of environment? How do we engage in apolitical kinds of activities that strengthen this core value of ours as a nation. In engaging and involving the arts in our daily lives, in our communities, in our nation, in our childrens’ lives, in every part of our lives. I wanted to have a conversation, because it’s not about us protecting our own organization. It’s like no, no. I’m gonna pull in my arms, and close the world around me. I’m just gonna protect me. What are the kinds of things that we need to do as we think about moving forward in the next few months, next year, and beyond, because we see this kind of chipping away? – There’s a story I’d like to tell, but first, for me, I think, what I’m finding is,
other people who work at and run arts organizations from small theaters to
large organizations, are actually picking up
the phone to each other and saying here we all are, which piece of this can we do together? Building bridges that might have been unthinkable even six months ago. I am talking to people across the country that I actually don’t know, but I know of. They’ve been in their
organizations for years, who when I call and say, shall
we have a chat about this? Absolutely. I came from one such thing from a big performing
arts center in Boston and spent two hours having
just that conversation. Then the other part of it is this. The Broad Stage is, we’re
going into our 10th year. We have a very well
educated upper middle class pretty much white audience, and one of the things
that we do extremely well, is we do opera nights. We have an enormously generous
donor who underwrites it and makes it possible for us to have singers who only sing at the MET, or only sing at the Skyland. Occasionally they come to
L.A. and sing in the opera, but pretty much they do not
sing at 500 seat houses. One of the donors who come to this, and he’s not a large donor. He’s capable of enormous wealth. He’s generous in very small ways to us. Has a young daughter. She was 15 when I met her, and she wants to be an opera singer, and she’s been training her whole life. He invited my husband
and I to go hear her sing and it was in the local
Catholic church in Santa Monica. He’s Jewish. They filled the church. They had been doing it for many years. There’s a program there, where they have classical
music with an orchestra, and various young opera singers come, and it costs very little to come, unless you want to sit
in the very front rows, and then it’s $200 and he gave John and I, some $200 seats, but we couldn’t park, and by the time we got there, there were no seats left. Our host said to me, just
find a seat anywhere, and put your bag on it, because if John’s still parking the car, you won’t be able to sit down. I did, and I sat two rows from the back in this pretty large church
that holds about 400 people, and we progressed with an evening of classical 18th and 19th century opera. The audience were people who had just come from cleaning someone’s house. There were people with
their grocery shopping. There were people with small children. There were people with their dogs. There was a Hispanic family
sitting in front of me. A mother a father, two sons, 16, 17, and three little girls,
all in their Sunday best. Clearly dressed to be in a church, and the music started and I looked around. People were in tears. There was complete rapt attention, and at the end of it the entire
congregation, if you like, stood and cheered. I was totally stunned, and this family sitting in front of me leaned over and in Spanish started to have an incredible conversation, about the depth of the
third passage of Verdi when she was singing in the tone. I looked at this, and I’ve been thinking
about it ever since, and where we are today, because it seems to me
that one of the things I can do today, and
we’ve talked about this at the Broad for years but it never had this application, is
take the Broad on the road. I would like to see us take our artists and to take local artists, because we have so many in Los Angeles, to the farmer’s market, to the local pub, to any small space, to this space. Anywhere, where people who
do not normally pay money and think that they belong
inside a performing arts center, can have art and artists in their life, because as far as I’m concerned
it’s going to save us. – Kathy, we talked a little bit in the greenroom about an experience that you had in terms of, and I would call it collective impact, or networks that work, is another way, of building relationships to address a particular issue and
it was community based, and you talked about involving
the NEA, environment. – I was very involved for many years, when I was at the Walker in Minneapolis with a group called Minnesota
Citizens for the Arts. We lobbied every year. We went to our capitol hill in Minnesota. We talked to our state representatives. Convinced them of the
importance of the arts. We made the economic argument. We made every argument you could know, and funding came and went depending on the state budget and
the mood of the Governor, and what have you. One Governor, as I was leaving the state, made a huge change in the arts and suddenly arts institutions were getting all kinds of money and then Jesse Ventura was named the Governor of the state
of Minnesota, the wrestler, and the only promise that he made to the citizens of Minnesota was that he would get the license
plate tab fees reduced, and he did that, and that was all he did, except for cut the arts. It was a huge budget, got slashed back to nothing, and there’s just been this
seesaw of funding in Minnesota. After I left this amazing thing happened, and I have no idea who figured this out, but the state is doing this to this day. They created something
called the legacy fund and the legacy fund are the
arts and cultural organizations, the environmental organizations,
and the NRA, the gun lobby. Why? Because the NRA and the
conservation community care about the same things. NRA wants land to be hunting on and the environmentalists
want to save that land. The arts kind of slid in the back door, saying hey we’ve got
these cultural treasures. You want to save the natural treasures. We want to save cultural treasures. This is the legacy of
the state of Minnesota, and they added I think
it was a quarter, penny, to every gallon of gas sold
in the state of Minnesota and now places like the Walker Arts Center are getting hundreds of
thousands of dollars a year from this legacy fund, and they also plugged it in in such a way that it was like the 100 year commitment to the legacy of the state, so the point that I was making when we were talking earlier was, times are tough. You get interesting things happening with strange bedfellows. People who you think might not necessarily be in your same court,
might be in your same court, and I think we have to
become very creative, as we look to a moment where we may lose the National Endowment for the Arts. We may lose the National
Endowment for the Humanities. Things that we all sort
of take for granted. Kind of everything’s
on the table right now. You’ve gotta get creative, and we’re creative people. – I love that story, because what it does is to illustrate the critical importance
of finding common ground. What is it that can bring you together, and as I think about
again, collective impact, and culture, and that example, are there ways in which we
can work across sectors, across fields or disciplines, in order to advance the importance
of the arts and culture. Where does the education come in? Where are there other areas? Did you want to say something? – The thing I would also say is that, another instance of collective action is when you talk about an organization, for instance, like Chorus America, which provides resources to choruses all over North America, and the choral world is really a bit like the small theater world, in the sense that these are
very small organizations, by and large, underfunded. They’re run by volunteers. They don’t have time
to do all the research that we talked about, prospect management. Prospect research. They don’t have any of those resources, and one of the things that
Chorus America has done that I find so interesting and compelling is they have done these
longitudinal studies over a series of years that they call the choral impact studies where they look at the numbers of people who actually sing in the United States. The numbers of people who are employed doing this activity of choral music and they provide resources so that if you have a childrens’ chorus and you want to get funding
from your state legislature, you have your talking points without having to go and do the research yourself, because you’re basically like the mom that’s volunteering their time to support this childrens’ chorus. Organizations like that
are worth knowing about. They’re worth researching
and finding out about. There’s Americans for the Arts. There’s the Arts Action Fund. They have lots of data, that I think is very helpful to all of us that are in the arts, about
looking at the bigger picture. The ways in which we really make a difference in peoples’ lives, and that goes across institutions, that isn’t just specific to
your particular organization. That would be I think one thing I think we shouldn’t lose
sight of in this new era. – I think that we probably ought to, yeah, open it up for Q and A, and if you have questions of any of us, please feel free. We’re at your disposal. Questions. There’s one, yay! Just tell us who you are. – [Brenda] My name’s Brenda, and I am considering attending Clairemont Graduate University. – Cool! – [Brenda] My question to the panelists is can you speak a little bit more about some of the struggles you faced, because I know you’ve
talked about your successes. It’d be good to hear about some of the struggles you faced, and how you overcame those. (audience laughing) – No, she didn’t say failures. It was struggle. We could call it a glass
ceiling, or a glass wall, or what obstacles were in your path? Jane. – I went into the world of business because I knew that I had
to provide for my family. I probably would anyway. I was in therapy 100 years ago, and said gosh if only I’d stayed married. We could have written a book. My therapist at the time said, no, you’d have had 20 women in
your garage making cannolis. I know you. (audience laughing) I think the struggles for me, certainly women of my generation, were that there was very
little space for women, and you had to ignore it. You had to see it. You had to acknowledge it, and you just had to push
through it, and ignore it, and I’m not saying that it is over. I don’t think when you go
into the workplace today it’s going to be a walk in the sunshine. I hope it will be mostly, but certainly for me it was literally a sense that I had no option, and it became very political
to me at a very early age. Yes, I had children to support. Yes, I wanted to be whoever I was. I wasn’t sure I had any
idea who I really was. I had to find her. Luckily I’m old enough. I’m close to finding her, but I think that never giving up, even when it is really hard, even when you go home and look
at yourself in the mirror, and say truly, seriously,
is this worth it? This job may not be worth it. It might not be the right place for you, but you cannot give up, and if for no other reason, there are millions of
little girls looking at you, and expecting you to do for them what they will one day
do for their daughters. If I sound like this is
truly political for me and always has been, it is
because it always has been, and I don’t think as women
that has changed very much. – Is this on? It’s on. I just like talking about money. (audience laughing) I think we raise money, we’re about money. Money makes the world go round. It’s an economic engine. It is absolutely shocking to me that women are still
earning less on the dollar. I think this is absolutely
worth fighting for. It enrages me, but you
gotta talk about it. How much money do you make? How much money does your friend make? How much money does the
guy across the hall make? Why does he make more than me? How do I get more? What do I do to do that? I have been fighting for every penny I’ve ever gotten in my life, and I have been very clear about it, and of course, now in
the non profit sector, it’s published, if you’re
one of the top five people, paid in an organization, that’s on the internet, on Guidestar, on the 990, page 14. Why do I know this? Because I look at it all the time. (audience laughing) I want to know what people are making, and I want to know how I compare, and I think it’s super important to be very open about this conversation and to challenge it when you are not being paid what the men
in your world are being paid. It’s just super super
critical and important. That for me isn’t really so much a stumbling block or a failure, it’s more, we as a society need to really step that up, especially women. – These are both really good comments. I’m gonna give a third perspective which is to think about yourself as you’re going through this work. Fundraising has successes and
it has noes, lots of noes, that you get before you get a yes, and oftentimes there’s a maybe, and sometimes the maybe can be a you really have to
rethink your whole idea of how you’ve approached your relationship with the person you’re working with, and the best way to do that, is to take care of yourself. I would advocate that in addition to paying attention to whether you’re being adequately compensated, and being persistent, that you also think about, how can I be my best person? If that means I get enough sleep, and I exercise, and I eat well, and I reserve time, in a
very demanding profession, where you have a lot of night time work. You reserve certain times for yourself, where you don’t work every night. That’s I think also part of presenting your best self to the donor, because if you get burnt out, you’re not gonna do your best work, and I see that with a
lot of younger people entering this field, where they come in with a big, lot of energy, and then you see them start
to get worn down by it, and you’ve got to be able to keep going back to the first principles. What is it that makes you passionate about this organization? Think about that, and in order to do that, you have to be well rested enough to be able to have that thought come through your mind. It can’t just be a grind. That would be my suggestion for you. – I’d like to add a point too, and this goes back to adult development and my slinky, and our conversations. Even though I said glass
ceiling, glass wall, an important other
metaphor is the labyrinth. There are times when we start down a path, and it doesn’t seem to be the right path. We seem to hit a place
that we can’t move through. At that point in terms of a life cycle, if you have, and I will take you back a second before I finish that, is that in the life cycle,
you have new beginnings, whether it’s a new career,
or a new relationship, or a new child, or something, but these new beginnings bring a high level of energy, and then another stage in that life cycle, is a plateau where you might be saying is this all there is? Maybe there’s something
I need to check out here, and you might say oh I need to fix this, and you recycle yourself, and say I can make this work. This is where I belong, but then you may get on this other side where you feel like you don’t have the energy you had when you started out in a new beginning, and at that point you
need to do this check in and say maybe this isn’t
the right place for me. Maybe I’m in this labyrinth, where there’s not the
pathway for me to go forward. Sometimes it takes a lateral move. Sometimes it takes backing up, taking a little break, dealing with a family situation, or something else, and then recalibrating yourself, letting go of the thing that doesn’t work, or things that don’t work, or saying I need to rethink where my values are, where my mission is, how what it is this life theme that seems to be feeding me, how can I renew it? How can I replenish it? How can I nurture it to bring it back? To move back into this new high energy and the new beginning again? I encourage you not to think about life even though everything in our society from going from K to 12 to undergraduate to graduate school and
then this linear path that you start here, and then you progress, don’t think of your life in a linear way. When you think of life in a linear way there’s a place where you go up, and this is part of adult development, and adult development
says, well you go up, and there’s this linear point. You retire and then
it’s like what happens? Nothing, right? It’s like, don’t accept it! Don’t accept it! It’s like okay, then how
do I recreate my life? How do I take what I’ve learned in these different stages, these different experiences, and instead of having a wall that I run up against, I turn and take another path. I think that’s one of
the most important things we think about, because life is filled with obstacles. Life is filled with opportunities as well, and if we’re open for the opportunities the obstacles fall away. That’s kind of my way of saying, don’t let those things get in the way, and you did the same thing. Each one of us have done that, and that’s life. We just have to figure out how to make it work for us and get back to how do we care for ourselves? Not in a selfish way, but in a way that allows us to be for the world what
the world needs us to be. – I’d just like to add one thing to that which is I think it’s true even today, that as women we have
been trained from birth even today to put everybody else first. – Yes. – And learning to put oneself first, exercising, eating well,
getting enough sleep, having some fun. – Tango! – Is almost the hardest thing to do. – It is. – Still today, it is
the hardest thing to do. That is a life’s work. – It is. Other questions? – [Tori] I have a question actually. Is it okay if I ask it, it’s Tori? – Yes, Tori, yes! You’re permitted and then
there’s a question over here. – [Tori] I’m sorry, Teresa you’re up next. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about this phrase that
mentored people mentor people and I’m wondering if each of you could speak to the mentors that you’ve had in your life, and how that affects how you mentor others and whether those
mentors were men or women and whether or not that had an effect. – Can we also speak to, and maybe not mentor, but the life model, that had an impact? – [Tori] Yes, you can
do whatever you want. (audience laughing) – I’ve been extraordinarily lucky in my career in terms
of the mentors I’ve had, and they’ve been both men and women, and I think the thing that’s been so amazing is not only that they taught me specific things by showing me how they did something incredibly well. They modeled behavior for me, but also they visioned for me something that I might
not have visioned myself. The example I gave of my boss at KCET saying I think you could
do foundation fundraising, and me thinking, what is that? I don’t know what that is. I knew what it was, but I couldn’t see myself
necessarily in that role. That’s I think a very important
thing that a mentor does, and so as a result of having had so many good mentors, I now am at the stage in my career where I consider it to be essential that I be a mentor to other people who are now doing fundraising
in my organization, and even outside of my organization, and I was gonna suggest that, I think one of the things that, is really important if you want a long term career in development, is that you start to put together these networks of people who you can pick up the phone and call when you hit one of these obstacles, and you know that they’ll be willing to take the time to talk you through it. I try to be that person
to some of my colleagues both at the L.A. Phil, and outside of the L.A. Phil, and I’m very grateful whenever somebody does that for me as well. I think mentoring is a hugely
important part of any career and specifically of this career. – One of my mentees is
in the house tonight. Ms. Sunny Ruche. Sunny and I got to know each other five years ago maybe. When were you at the? Yeah. We met through a mutual
friend, Joanne Highler who runs the Broad Museum, and we just like hit it off. We had a fun lunch and we
got to know each other, and we’ve been on this
wild adventure together. She calls me, I call her. We get together, and we just have this
wonderful relationship and I’d known Sunny for maybe six months when she invited me to her wedding. It had just hit us that fast. I’m really grateful that I have this wonderful
young woman in my life, and that we have a lot of fun sharing each other’s lives together. That’s a fun thing. – All the mentors I ever had were men. I don’t think at the time I even knew they were mentors, frankly. I look back now, and realize
when I was first at CBS, my boss’s boss’s boss said to me, you just keep your head down, you could run this shop one day. Are you kidding me? (audience laughing) I think over the years, especially when I worked
in the television business, there were several heads of companies who begrudgingly said
she’ll probably be okay. I think what it has led to is that I have mentored in my
career a lot of people, mostly women, not entirely, and I do know one thing about myself. I’m much tougher on the
women who work for me, even today, than I am on the men. I expect the men to be competent and good. I expect the women to
be goddamn brilliant, and mostly they are, and it’s not something that I say, proudly, I just think
it’s true of who I am. – I too, because I moved in a career path. I used to be a fundraiser with United Way if you know what United Way is, and all of those that
I worked with were men, and for me, it was their recognition of the value that I brought, and a respect for what I brought, that made the difference for me, and I could feel it. I could see it, and you can. When you have that kind
of connection with people you can see and feel it. Then I go back to, in
terms of a life model, it was my mother. She was legally blind, but we never knew she was. We were raised on a farm and she was an educator, and we can remember saying, pointing out these
pictures of fall colors. We lived in upstate New York, or something else in the distance, and she’d say oh that’s beautiful. That’s beautiful. Never knew that she couldn’t see it. Her life was about teaching, and learning, and helping others develop, and that was the life model part of me, was that’s what I grew to know, and that was what my life was, whether I’m teaching or
I’m involved in community, it’s that giving back
that was so important and not complaining
about what I didn’t have, but recognizing what was of value and those people did do that. I felt like I always had
the mentors that I needed and the support I needed, but it came in so many different ways. There was a question over here. – [Teresa] Hello, my
name is Teresa Condido. I am a CGU graduate, 2014, and former student of Sarah’s. Excuse me, Mrs. Gotrocks, not Sarah. – Oh yeah, right yeah. Did we do the Gotrocks with you? – [Teresa] You did. I’m pleased to see it again. – It was at the Drucker School. – [Teresa] I’ve actually brought
it up in interviews before. – Oh, yes. – [Teresa] After CGU I
transitioned my career in the arts to fundraising and I’ve been working for a few years now in fundraising, and one of the trends I’ve been observing is that some of the
more traditional methods of fundraising such as perhaps
direct mail, or telefunding, are starting to lose efficacy and I wanted to hear if perhaps any of you had thoughts on building relationships in the digital age. – Wonderful question. Kathy, you’ve really nailed that one. – Is this on? It’s on. I think there are some themes
that are emerging here. I think generations are certainly a theme. Sarah has been a mentor to me. I get to have the pleasure of spending time with Sunny. Different generations, you approach differently in fundraising. I have a niece whose 15, it’s not about texting,
it’s all about FaceTime. I have the average member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences is a 61 year old woman, white. I’m gonna talk to her differently than I’m gonna talk to the 15 year old. We have to think about what are the different strategies and approaches to most successfully reach those people whether it’s in a mass market environment or if it’s a face-to-face conversation, and obviously you don’t
have the time in the world to reach all your donors
in a face-to-face setting, so you do have to break down and think about what does
your audience look like and what are the strategies I can use to reach that audience, and a lot of times it
involves a lot of testing. I kind of thought I left my
direct mail days behind me but I’m now working with a
direct mail open audience and so we’ve got to think about really smart strategies to reach that 61 year old white woman, and you also look at crowdfunding. I created the USA
projects crowdfunding site for artists to raise money. Those are small campaigns. The average crowdfunding
campaign raises $10,000 but the average campaign also brings in about 200 donors. It’s like now you’ve got
this universe of donors. Some of those people could potentially be bigger donors for you down the line. The lesson we would say to the artist is put up your project, raise your money, and now every single year, you can go back to that
same group of people, because 66% of donors repeat
their gift every single year, and if you’re smart, they’ll give you more money. As you start to analyze who are those 200 people who are my friends, and roll up a couple that could maybe do a match for the crowdfunding campaign you do next year because matches work really well in
a crowdfunding environment. It’s different strategies
for different age groups. It’s different strategies for different kinds of projects. I think one of the most fun things about being in the
world of philanthropy is it’s so creative. You can do different stuff all the time. You sort of throw the
noodle up against the wall and if it sticks, yay. If it doesn’t, good try. What’s the next good idea? It’s an opportunity to be
really creative, I think. – Other questions? – [Woman] Just a sequel question, to that question just raised, which is what I’m hugely interested in. Are you currently doing anything, any fundraising initiatives, or any kind of marketing campaigns to specifically target 20
something, 30 something, affluent, donor prospects in
your organizations, anything? – We definitely have
efforts to attract people who are that generation,
who are 20s and 30s. It’s more from the standpoint of getting them to become patrons, of the L.A. Phil than it is
specifically asking for gifts, but we understand very clearly that we need to build the next
generation of audience, and there’s a lot of
effort put around that. We have a program called KODA that is for younger folks, to come to the L.A. Phil, and it’s been quite successful. – Tori, are we? Yes! First of all, I just want to thank Jane, and Susan, and Kathy, for being fun! For being the leaders
that you are in the arts and in life in so many ways. A very impressive three women. I’d like you to join me in
thanking them for being here. (audience applause)

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