Who Cares? Why Bother? 2018 | Media Arts and Writing

Who Cares? Why Bother? 2018 | Media Arts and Writing


>>Hello. Thanks, everybody,
for coming today. My name is
Klaas Kwant. This is
Noah DeSmit. We work here at GRCC in
the Media Department, which means we’re often
recording presenters like he and I–
in fact, this morning, I was up in the booth,
running the camera, recording the people
who presented in here. Noah was in the other room
recording the folks presenting
in there. We record a lot of
different things on campus. Some of you we may
have even interviewed, as students, for different
promos for the college. We do a lot of
videos for… the staff and faculty
at the college, to teach them how to
do different things. So, that’s kind of,
in a nutshell, what our
responsibilities are. I was thinking,
this morning, as I was recording
the two presenters that were here
before me, what’s different about
the kind of writing we do from the kind of writing I
heard the presenters talk about, and the presenters who were
in here this morning anyway were talking about things
they write about themselves. Their own experiences,
writing in journals, or authoring
a book, and communicating with
publishers of the book, where what Noah and I usually
do when it comes to writing is we’re writing something
on behalf of somebody else who is an expert in
a particular field. And you’re gonna see a few
examples of that today. So whether it is a chef
here at the college or a math
professor, or… the folks who are from the
Institutional Research Office, Noah and I don’t
particularly know a lot about any
of those topics, but obviously we have
professors who do, but they don’t know
how to do videos, or at least not
particularly well, so we work with them to
actually write the scripts to help people
like you learn whatever it is
they want to teach. So in a way, you could
say we’re translators of whatever they’re
an expert in. So that’s my summary of
our approach to writing for media
here at GRCC. Anything you
want to say?>>No, yeah, I think
that’s pretty good. Maybe one thing to add,
and that’s– my name’s Noah, by the
way, just to reiterate… how Klaas mentioned
my name is Noah. It is Noah.
(chuckling) One more thing
to add, we do a certain kind
of work at the college that requires us to know a
lot of different skills, so I didn’t go to school
to become a writer. I didn’t study English, but,
I did study audio and video, and because of this position
that we’re in at the college, often, the writing
falls on us. And I did actually do some
writing before this position at a TV station,
writing for promos, and I learned
a lot there. But we’re essentially
a one-man band when it comes to
making videos here.>>Two-man,
one-man band.>>Sure, yeah, two-man,
one-man situation. But if it’s my project, I’m
sort of doing everything. I’m writing, sometimes casting
if we are casting someone, shooting, editing,
getting approval, working with a client if it
is a chef here at the college or a math instructor,
whatever it may be, kind of doing
everything, and so, the writing process has
been a learning process. And it is certainly
different, I think– uniquely different than what
you may be hearing a lot about here at this conference,
because of what Klaas mentioned, how we’re often
interpreting for people who don’t necessarily
have the video skills but want to put what
they know onto video. That’s all
I’d add.>>I think we’re lucky because
we get a lot of freedom when somebody asks us to
do a project for them. Granted, they’re
the content expert. In a way, they
teach us first, before we try to
help them teach you, but as soon as they’ve given
us just enough knowledge that we could actually write
something that makes sense, we kind of run with it,
and you’re gonna see that. So without any further ado,
do you want to–>>Yeah, let’s talk about–
>>Kick off the first one?>>Let’s start
talking about it. So what we’re gonna do
in this presentation– we have three examples, three
videos that we’ve created here, and we’re gonna talk
about how we went about the writing process
for each one of them, and how we wrote it, what kind
of inspired us to write it, and technically, how we
went about it, and why. So we’re going to have a video
about creating characters, and then we’re
gonna have a video about a simple
learning object, and then we’re
gonna have a video where the writing fills in
the gaps of the storytelling. So this first example is
about creating characters. Has anybody here
seen a movie before? I dunno– so okay, a few
of you have seen a movie. Good, good.
(chuckling) In movies, there
are characters and in most stories,
there are characters. They are what
drive the story. Does anybody have some
favorite characters, just characters from
a TV show or a movie or Netflix, Hulu,
what have you, that… that you like?>>(indistinct).
>>Cowboys. Why do you
like cowboys?>>(indistinct).>>They’re– yeah, they
can be pretty funny. Yeah, for sure, yeah,
they’re great for that. Anything else? Yeah?
>>(indistinct).>>Mark Wahlberg–
well, that’s an actor. (laughing) Are there any
characters he’s played that you particularly
enjoy?>>He does kind of always play
the same kind of character, so.>>Yeah, tough guys,
yeah. So there’s all different kinds
of characters that we like– tough guys,
cowboys– and these characters have
to be written, right? What needs to take place
is someone sits down and writes these
characters down, what they say,
where they come from, who they are,
what they do, and sometimes in our videos,
we need to do that. Now, we’re not making these
long, narrative stories. We’re not making
feature films with Mark Wahlberg
or cowboys, typically. Have we ever made
anything with a cowboy?>>Yet– say “yet.”
>>Oh, yet– not yet. Anyone that has an idea
for a cowboy video, see us afterward.
>>Yeah.>>Or maybe not. So someone has to sit
down and write down what these characters are,
where they come from, what they say, what
makes them who they are, and there are so
many different ways you can build
a character, and I’m gonna talk
about one way, but by no means is
it the only way. The– the–
um… The only correct way,
so to speak. It’s just one method that
you could potentially use, and that method
is really just drawing upon your
own experiences. Whether it’s yourself, how you
feel as a character sometimes, because I’m sure,
if you’re like me, sometimes you may feel
like a very happy person and sometimes you may feel
like a very angry person. Sometimes you may feel like
a very emotional person, sometimes you
may feel… like a comedian, and so you can draw
upon those experiences from within
yourself. You can also draw upon
the things that you– the people that you have
experienced in your life. So that’s what
I like to do. I like to draw upon
my own experiences to kind of flesh
out characters. To give you some
context for this video that we’re gonna
show as an example, The Institutional
Research and Testing… Institutional Research
and Testing, or is it Institutional… Institutional Research
here at the college. They do all kinds
of research, including what you all
think of your classes. Remember when you, at
the end of your class, when you take
a survey, and you kind of
let the college know what you thought
of the class, what things you didn’t like,
what things you liked, how the
instructor did? A lot of times the
college has trouble getting students
to fill that out, and so, Institutional
Research wanted to make a video to
encourage students to, “Hey, after
you have this class, “fill out the survey,
it really helps us, “it helps you, it’s
good all around. “Please fill out the survey
at the end of your class.” So that was the task
that they gave us and that I took on
as a project, was, a video that encouraged you
to fill out those surveys. What I decided to do was–
I was a bit inspired by– you guys know Key & Peele,
the sketch comedy show? There is one sketch where
there’s an interpreter for former president
Barack Obama, where Barack Obama is saying
something extremely eloquently, and then there is an
interpreter that says what maybe Barack Obama
was actually thinking, behind the guise
of the eloquency, and that inspired me
to think of an idea for this video for
Institutional Research where there was a very
professorial character who, in language that
was hard to understand, expressed his desire for you
to fill out these surveys, and how to do it,
and when to do it, etcetera. But then, there was also
a student character right next to him that would
interpret for the student. Kind of annoyed, on her phone,
just breaking it down much more simple in ways
that you can understand. And these are characters that
I could definitely write because I have been both
of those characters. I have a Master’s
in Education and have had to write
many papers on education at the
graduate level. I have taught as an adjunct
for Ferris State University and– but I’ve also obviously
been a college student, and I can remember
the frustrations of, “Yo, just give it to me
simple– just, right? “Just break this down– stop
with all of the craziness “and all of the clutter,
just, what are we doing?” And so, I could draw
upon those experiences to write these
characters. And that’s what I would
encourage you to do if you’re attempting
to write characters, is draw from those
own experiences. Think about how you’ve
felt as a person. Now, if I was making
a video, let’s say, that contained a character
who was an African-American, woman, lesbian, trying
out for the ballet. If that was one
of the characters, I would have a really hard time
writing for that character because I’m not
African-American– I don’t know if you
guys could tell. I’m also a man– not sure if
you could tell that either. I’m straight,
and– oh, I don’t really know
anything about the ballet. So I’ve been to
few ballets, but I don’t really know
anything about dancing or anything
like that, so. So it would be really
hard for me to draw upon any kind of experiences
that would make that character seem
real to the people who ARE like
that character. People who– you know, if
someone was a black woman, lesbian, who was trying out
for the ballet, watched that, they would be like– if
I attempted to write it, they’d probably not
resonate with it at all and not really
understand, because I have no idea
where they’re coming from. So it would be
very difficult, and I would have to
probably enlist someone else to help me with
developing that character. These characters
I knew pretty well, and so that’s what I drew
upon to create this video. So, let’s watch it.
>>Let’s watch it. Do you want to dim
the lights, Taylor? Our intern, Taylor,
is in the booth.>>Whoa.
>>No, we did not. Well, not in this display–
>>Not in this format. (upbeat music) (classical music)
>>Greetings and salutations, GRCC students. My name is
Professor Simons, and I’ll be carefully expressing
the varying complexities surrounding the post-course
institutional research and planning
evaluations.>>Uh, hi. This is about
class surveys. (classical music)
>>Instructors hope to leverage the valuable and varied
responses provided by students to refine our
objectives and better align
our course to accommodate
the ever-changing and demographically
diverse student body.>>If you like a class,
you can let them know. If you don’t like a class,
you can help fix it. (classical music)
>>Typically, around 14 days prior to the end
of your course, you will receive the
relevant evaluation URLs associated with
your specific courses.>>Two weeks before the class
ends, you get the survey. (classical music)
>>You may fill out your evaluation
any time between the time you’ve
received the evaluation and exactly 11:59 PM on
the scheduled last day of–>>Fill it out before
the last day of class. (classical music)
>>If you realize you’ve answered any
question erroneously, email course–>>If you messed up,
email details to [email protected]
from your college email.>>Once your class
has completed, and final grade information
is posted, the instructor–>>They read the surveys
after grades are posted.>>You can rest assured
that no instructor will be able to determine–
>>It’s anonymous.>>In the rare case you somehow
do not receive an evaluation to fill out–
>>If you didn’t get one, email
[email protected]>>There are just a
couple more components of the process to
briefly consider.>>Oh, one
more thing.>>Be sure to understand
the spectrum of choice you have be–
>>Left side, disagree. Right side, agree. Be sure about it, and
gotta click “Submit.”>>If there are any more
questions you have regarding the process of
course evaluations, do not–>>There’s FAQs
if you need ’em. (classical music)
>>And finally, I want to take the time
to thank you for your time while watching this informative
and hopefully fun video about course
evaluations.>>Adios. (upbeat music)>>So make sure to
fill out your survey, at the end of
every class.>>Okay, so I kind
of talked quite a bit before the video, so, I
won’t talk any more about it. Are there any questions
after all of that? Anything at all– it’s
totally cool, you can ask.>>And I think it’s
also important to know that we were asked
to do that video, just like we’re asked to do
all the projects we work on, and even though somebody’s
a content expert, what they give you to
work with, lots of times, sounds like what the professor
character sounded like. So Noah was provided this
list of things to cover that probably
wasn’t too far away from what the
professor said. And when we get something
like that, we know, who’s the audience, we
have to simplify this and make it at least
a little entertaining.>>Yeah, honestly,
for probably 50% of what the professor
character says, I honestly just looked
at the instructions on the website for course evals,
(chuckling) and it was pretty
complicated already, so I just sort of added
onto a lot of that.>>Okay, so next,
we’re gonna talk about simple
learning objects. Like I just said,
lots of times, what people give us
to work with is a list, and any time you’re
expected to learn something and you’re operating from
a set of instructions, you’re following
a list in order. And we could just duplicate
that list in a video, but again, that
wouldn’t necessarily be very
entertaining. So we try to come up
with some approach to conveying
that information that hopefully makes
it memorable to you. And one thing we’ve learned,
over the last decade, is that… what
people retain are things they learn
in short bursts. They’re evaluated on it somehow
to make sure they got it, and then they can move
on to something else. And the expectation that
anybody is going to sit down and watch an hour-long
lecture online, we know it
doesn’t happen. We record a
lot of them. People watch
a few minutes, here and there, of any
lecture we’ve recorded, but we can tell because
YouTube gives us statistics, how little of a long lecture
anybody’s gonna watch. So knowing that,
we’ve got basically a short
attention span, we’ve gotten in the
practice of making sure that what we’re creating
is relatively short, and what we’re
gonna show you now is an academic example
for the math department of teaching a
particular subject. And without explaining
what the subject is, what I want you to look for
is a technique we often use, and, in fact, Noah did it
right when we were starting where we tell you what
we’re gonna teach you, you get to learn it,
and then we review what it is we
supposedly taught you. So using that model, we
apply it to a short video, and we end up with
something like this, so. Wait for Taylor
to dim the lights. (bright guitar music)>>Hi, I’m Nancy Forrest,
a Mathematics professor at Grand Rapids
Community College. And today, I want
to introduce you to a slightly different way
of looking at circles. (music) Yes, I said
“circles”! Now, you may be thinking that
you already know about circles. You know there’s
some kind of formula for calculating the
circumference of a circle, and once you know that,
what else is there? What else
is there? Well, it’s actually
very simple. It isn’t new, but it’s a
different way of looking at something that you
probably already know. But first, let’s
start with the basics. There’s a wonderful
number called “pi,” and as you can
see from my shirt, it’s my favorite
number. And that’s because with pi, we
can calculate amazing things. Simply put, pi
is the ratio of the circumference of a
circle to its diameter. It always has
the same value, no matter what the
size of the circle, and the value of pi
is approximately 3.14. (music) Perhaps the most famous
formula that uses pi is for the circumference
of a circle, and you may recognize it–
2 pi r, where r is the radius
of the circle like this, and the value
of pi is 3.14. It’s simple– just plug in
the two numbers, and voilà! You know the
circumference of a circle. But if you look at
this formula carefully, you may notice that as
simple and elegant as it is, there’s a way to make it
more simple and more elegant. Do you see it? Do you see
it yet? What you might have
noticed is there’s a way of doing something that we
in mathematics call “reducing,” in calculating the beginning
of the formula, 2 times pi. Well, we just double the
value of pi to get one number, and then you can multiply
it by the radius. And what do we call
this new number? “Double pi”?
Nope! The name for the value of 2 pi
is another Greek letter, and that’s the
lesson for today. Instead of 2 pi, we
call this number “tau,” and since its
value is twice pi, the simpler formula
is tau times r equals the
circumference. Simpler… and in math,
simpler is better. So let’s do a
quick review. (music) So the original formula for
calculating the circumference of a circle, was
the classic 2 pi r.>>We simplify by doubling pi,
2 times 3.14, and that new value
of 6.28, equals tau. So the new simpler
formula reads, tau r, and that equals the
circumference of a circle.>>So today, you learned
about the value of tau, and you also learned
that you can sometimes even take one of the most
famous formulas in math and make it
better. Now, don’t get me wrong, my
favorite number is still pi. But since today
is June 28th, you know, 6-28, we’ll
let tau rule today. Happy Tau Day, and
thanks for watching. (upbeat music)>>So, I’m not a
mathematician. I just worked with
a mathematician to understand
the concept, and it’s not that
complicated a concept. But I wrote that script,
ran it by the mathematician, she memorized
the lines, Noah and I last
summer shot it right across the street here
in the practice field, and he did a really nice
job editing that together. But that’s another example
of the kind of work we do that we found to be
pretty effective. If we can create an entertaining
lesson, short period of time– I think this is also a
good example of casting. We didn’t have to cast someone
to PLAY a math professor, Nancy Forrest IS
a math professor, but she also has a really
good presence on camera. She’s got good energy,
she seems to be having fun every time she’s been
in front of the camera, so we lucked
out there. But all those things
together, hopefully, end up creating something
that all of you now, if somebody asks
you, “What’s tau?” you’ll know what
the answer is. So any questions
about that process?>>Klaas, if you
could maybe explain, how you actually went about
putting those words on the page. So, how did you go
from, “Here’s an idea, “we want to teach people
about tau in three minutes,” to, “Here is
the script”? What was the
process like?>>Well, I think you have to
start with a basic understanding of what you’re
trying to teach. And again, I’m not
a mathematician. I didn’t know
what tau was before I talked about
it with Nancy Forrest. I did know the
formula 2 pi r, and hopefully everyone
here who has had geometry is familiar with
that formula. It happened to be in
the news, I think, so that sparked
some interest, and, I approached
Nancy, I said, “Hey, if we were to sit down
and come up with a video, “what would you
want to include?” And then, she and I
together took the time to look at other videos
that had been done trying to explain
what tau was, most of which took
a lot longer to do it, and I think sometimes if
you spend too much time trying to explain something,
people not only stop listening, but they’ll end up
being more confused than when
you started. So we glean from all
that information, you know, what is
the core of this? And then, decided, “Okay,
where can we stage it “so we’re not just in
front of a whiteboard,” or in the case of
her at the end, in front of what we
call a “lightboard,” explaining it the way a
teacher typically would in front
of a class. So I said, “Let’s go out
to the practice field.” We’ll use a couple of
cameras, one that’s up high so we’ve got all this
space to work with to draw a circle, and
Nancy could move around, another camera
getting a close-up to get her funny
expressions. So we take all
that information about what we’re
trying to teach. We put it on one
side of a page so she knows what
she’s going to say, and then on the other
side of the page are the corresponding
visuals, so that she can picture, even
before we’ve shot anything or showed her any of the
footage that we recorded, what’s gonna be on the
screen when she’s talking. So, Nancy, as the
content expert, can say, “Yes, Klaas,
you got that right, “that’s a good suggestion,
that’s a way to do it,” or, “No, don’t do that,
that’ll just confuse students,” or, “That’s
not accurate.” So that’s basically
the processes– to write something,
go back and forth with the person who actually
can verify if it’s accurate, because I’m doing my best,
I’m not a mathematician. I’m just trying to make
it fun and memorable. Sometimes, we go
a little too far, but usually, professors
will tell us, “No, that’s not accurate,
we need to change it.” And then, we
record it.>>Cool.>>Any other
questions? Okay. So for the next part
of our presentation–>>Anybody have any
questions just about life, non-related to this, that
you just really need to ask? No, okay. Well, just let us
know if you do! (both chuckling)
>>We’re ready.>>We’re ready
for anything. Okay, our last example,
I’m gonna talk about is a cooking show that
has been produced here at the college
for quite a while. We have a Culinary
Institute here, if you guys didn’t know,
where people learn to cook and be chefs. And one of our former
chef instructors, whose name is
Angus Campbell, for a long time– for a long
time did a little cooking show here on campus that
we would produce. And a couple years ago,
we got a grant to be able to really “up”
the production quality of this cooking show for
about a dozen episodes, and we got to travel
abroad and make this show. And it was
great. It’s sort of an
intersection of cooking, documentary, travel,
and culture, much like
Anthony Bourdain. I’m sure you guys
maybe seen something about Anthony Bourdain, a
show that he’s done perhaps. Probably not as
good as those shows, in fact– (laughing)
>>Better.>>Definitely not as good–
oh, better, yeah! We wish. But it’s certainly along the
same vein as far as styling. And how do you write
for a show like that? It’s quite a challenge
to kind of figure it out, but once we got
a groove going, it actually worked
really well. During the actual
production, Klaas and I would just sort
of shoot whatever happens. We would do some directing, like
where we wanted them to stand, what we might want them to
talk about specifically, but really,
it was just… many things happening
all the time, that we were just trying to
capture and keep up with. We would go to a
Parmesan cheese factory and shoot the whole
process of them making Parmesan cheese,
and tasting it. Then, we’d run across the
village to a balsamic vinegar– a facility in which they
made balsamic vinegar, and do the same
sort of thing, and we’re just trying to
keep up and shoot everything. So when we’d get
back… home. (chuckling)
“Home”? Back to work, which
sometimes seems like home.
(laughing) When we’d get back to work,
and we’ve got all this footage, hours and hours of
footage to comb through, there are considerations
you need to make. Number one being, “How do
we make this into a story?” So that’s what we were
really trying to do is tell a story
in each episode. So the challenge became,
for example, one episode, “How do you take
three hours of footage, “cut it down to 30 minutes,
and have it be interesting, “entertaining, and
tell a cool story?” And what we found
was a good method was to take the best of the
best that we had on video. Cut those together,
and fill the gaps– that’s why we have
“Filling the Gaps” here– fill the gaps of the
coolest and best moments with some of our
own writing, that would eventually be a
voiceover from the host, the chef instructor,
Angus Campbell. We’re gonna show you an
example of what that is, but… my process was to, again,
find some really cool moment, cut that together,
move to the next piece, the next part of the story
and connect the story through writing what would
make sense to the audience, helping them to understand
what is happening here, what is going on,
how is it all connected. This typically
manifested itself in establishing people,
places, what we’re doing. So often at the
beginning of segments, this voiceover,
what I’m writing, would establish that. Where are we?
Who are these people? What are
we doing? Why? That’s what I would write
about at the very beginning, what Angus would
voice over, and then we’d
show the segment. When I was actually editing
everything together, I would actually
record my own voice saying all these little
bits that I’ve written to connect the pieces,
and pop it in– (coughing)
excuse me– pop it in as a
placeholder. And then, once the
whole episode was done, I’d have Angus come in
and record his voice saying all those little
pieces that I’ve written, that connect the bits
of the story together. Everybody tracking
on that so far? Any questions about
how I did that? Right. Let’s just watch it,
see what happens? (upbeat music)>>(Angus, voiceover)
I wanted Megan and April to learn how an olive
plucked off the tree becomes the olive oil
we use in the kitchen. Here, in Puglia, at the
Montaltino factory, Nicolai helped us understand
the modern process of making
olive oil. So they come in in
these large crates?>>(speaking Italian).
>>Straight off the trees.>>(with Italian accent)
With these big boxes, they are emptied in this tank
here and they get cleaned up. (music) So after they’re
all cleaned up, they come through and they
go through purifying process which, if there are
some impurities like little stones, soil,
they will be all cleaned. (music) So after this, olives,
they are all washed, they come through and they are
dropped into this big mill.>>They just get ground
down into a paste.>>They get ground
down to a paste, yes. (upbeat folk
violin music)>>(Angus, voiceover)
After the paste has
been homogenized, it goes into
the presses. The first pressing, which
separates the pulp from the oil, is considered extra virgin,
used mostly to finish dishes. The second pressing
is a second quality, used mainly
for cooking. And the third is put back into
the ground as fertilizer. From the presses,
the oil is filtered and put into
2,000-ton silos. Finally, they’re
ready to be bottled. (upbeat jazzy music) Girls, come
and see this. This is a beautiful little
model of the way it used to be, with oil– you see,
this is the little press and the little
stone. Look at the wee wheels
that would crush the thing. And it ends up in little
bottles, that’s so funny. (upbeat folk music) (voiceover)
Inside the dining area of Osteria del Caroseno is
a piece of Italian history. An old mill used for
making olive oil sits inside the floor
for the guests to see. (music) The Italians we’ve met
have been so generous, and that theme continued
as the talented chef of the restaurant
so graciously offered to teach my students a
couple of amazing plates.>>(speaking Italian). (with Italian accent)
Hello, we are going to make two plates of
Italian plate, yes? One is classic Italian,
which is spaghetti carbonara, and one is fave e cicoria–
fava beans, yes, with chicory. (music) This is very
slow-dried pasta….>>So if you want
to see more of that, CookingWithAngus.com is
where you can watch more. But that gives you an example
of the process that we took to write the various
components of Angus’s voiceover that hopefully connected
the story for you. There were two examples
of that in that clip. The first one did what
I mentioned before. It establishes who we
are, what we’re doing, why we’re doing it,
where we are, because when
we’re shooting– when we were shooting those
scenes, nobody really did that. We didn’t really
all stop and say, “Okay, let’s all explain, like–
let’s introduce each other, “let’s talk about who we
are, and why we’re here.” And if they did, usually,
it took a really long time. So this, in a way, made it
much quicker, much simpler, easier for the
audience to understand, and we can get right
into the good stuff. The second voiceover
within the clip, that explained the process
that the olive goes through while it’s getting pressed
and turned into oil, that was done because
the actual process, as it was being explained
to us and we recorded it, took an extremely
long time. And obviously, I’m not gonna
put an audience through 15, 20 minutes–
(coughing) excuse me– 15, 20 minutes
of explanation, when in 30 seconds, I
can write a voiceover that much more
easily explains it and we just show
a few shots, and then get right
back to the good stuff. So again, using writing
to fill those gaps, to make it more
entertaining, more simple, easier to understand,
and connect the story. Another method that
we’ve used here in Media.>>Yeah, and it
makes me think, the two examples that
Noah has talked about– that first one with the
student and the professor and then this one– are
really good examples of how writing
compresses time. Because if he hadn’t
taken the time to figure out how to say
something more succinctly, those videos would
have been a lot longer. And that’s another value
of taking the time to write something well
is you’re gonna be able to convey the information
a lot quicker, and hopefully
more memorably.>>Any questions about the
“Cooking with Angus” video? Or filling gaps,
telling stories, with some
voiceover writing?>>Nope.
>>Okay!>>Well, thanks
for coming.>>Thanks for
having us.>>Hope you are all
ready for a quiz on how to make
olive oil, what tau is.
>>How to calculate tau. And if you can take
your course survey.>>Yeah, do
your surveys. They matter. Okay.
>>Bye!>>Bye, thanks
for coming. (applause)

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