Leaf Dust Photoshop Tutorial

Leaf Dust Photoshop Tutorial


Hey guys! I’m Jessie and for today’s
video I’m gonna show you how to make… this. I’m not really sure what to call
this… dissolving-leaf thing I created, but it looks cool, and we’re gonna make it.
Also if you stay tuned until the end of the video you can learn more about my
subscriber giveaway! Okay, before we get started I need to say that this awesome
stock photo came from Matt at Spaz-Stock. I’ve linked to his deviantART stock
account in the description. Now for the fun to begin. To start off I always like
to duplicate the background photo. It just makes it so much easier to fall
back if I, you know, screw everything up. We’re going to go ahead and duplicate
this twice. On the topmost layer take the quick selection tool and select the leaf.
With the leaf still selected go ahead and add a layer mask. We’re going to
refine the selection now, first by right-clicking on the mask and going to
refine mask and smoothing the edges, then by taking the brush tool and painting in
parts we missed in erasing parts we don’t need selected. I’m adding a layer
of red around 60 percent opacity behind the layer I’m working on to help
better see what I’m doing, and I’ll just hide this when I’m done. You don’t need
to worry too much about the bottom half since we’ll be leaving that pretty much
intact anyway. Also I’m terrible at remembering to name my layers so I’m
gonna do that now. I’ll call a top layer “Leaf” & the second to the bottom layer
“Background” & the red layer, well, “Red.” Anyway it’s time to take the clone tool
and start painting over the leaf from the tree roots behind it. This will let the
background peek through the part of the leaf we’ll be taking away. It doesn’t
really have to be perfect as you won’t see most of it when you’re done but I
hate clone stutter so I just try to make the clone stamping look as natural as
possible. This can be aided with the patch tool. It helps blend in textures
from other parts of the photo to get rid of that awful clone stutter. Once you’re done with that duplicate the
leaf layer and apply the layer mask. I’m gonna duplicate the leaf layer one more
time and hide the original. Like I said I like to have a backup to fall on in case
I really don’t like the direction I’ve taken something, it’s just much more easy
to start over that way. Now take a simple round brush at about 30 to 40 percent
hardness and set the scattering and shape dynamics to give your desired
scatter pattern. I used a brush about size 7 with a spacing around 180% & a scatter of 1000%.
I also adjusted the angle roundness and size chitters to get scatter a more
random organic feel. I’m gonna pause here for a moment and take this time to
say that I realized I described my settings pretty vaguely here. Yeah other tutorials out there are really precise and give you the exact numbers they set
their brushes to and whatnot, but when you go to do this on your own with your
own images none of my current settings are going to matter. If you’re a beginner
I don’t want you to get stuck on the numbers and fall into the rut of “I want
to create this effect so I must plug in these exact numbers!” It just doesn’t
always work like that. Creating digital art like this involves a lot of
experimentation, changing settings and seeing what works with the images you’re
working with. Sometimes I’ll mess around with my settings like 3, or even 10 times
before I’m satisfied. Don’t be afraid to experiment. Alright lecture time over let’s go back to the tutorial. Hide the top leaf layer and with black selected as the foreground color paint
on the mask of the second leaf layer to erase bits of the leaf and reveal the
background. When you’re satisfied with erasing the leaf go ahead and reveal the
top leaf layer again and create a new blank layer above that. Select the clone
stamp tool and set the brush the same as before and clone some “leaf dust.”
You’ll notice I do this on a couple layers. Again, it helps if you like what
you’ve done so far but also think it’s missing something, but don’t really want
to commit to anything new just yet. this way if the new layer of dust doesn’t
look great you can just delete it and start over without losing what parts you
actually liked so far. After you’ve cloned a bit of that go ahead and hide
the top leaf layer again to see what you’ve got so far. I chose this time to
refine what I’ve done, painting back bits of the leaf in some places and erasing
out other places I didn’t desire it to be. Now we’re gonna add an outer glow to
the dust layers. I changed the color of the glow, picking a nice bright orange
out of the leaf and setting the blend mode to soft light. I also added a curves
adjustment layer and tried out a few photo filters with various blending
modes before I decided I didn’t like any of them and just deleting the layer. Like I
said, experiment a little. You might find an effect you didn’t even know you
wanted and just winds up really making the peace. Around this time I decided
there wasn’t enough size variation my leaf dust so I pulled out my clone stamp
again brought the size down to about 4 and adjusted this size and shape
dynamics again to make the scatter less concentrated and painted some more dust
on another layer. After deciding I was satisfied with how the dust was looking
for now I went ahead and combined all my dust layers together and refined my
image even further, erasing parts I don’t like and painting
more dust in areas I found lacking, even going in and adjusting my outer glow
effect again. Almost done. I’m looking at it and just looks a little “too stiff.” I’m
sure you agree. Easy enough fix. just reveal the top leaf
layer again, clone some more dust in various brush sizes and hide the layer
again when you’re done. It’s kind of amazing how just a little bit of
tweaking can make your work look a hundred times better. I think this might
need just a little something more. My goal is to give it more of a dreamy
fantasy look so let’s try out some adjustment layers. First I grouped
everything together and made a copy, hiding the original group. Then I
flattened my new group and duplicated the layer. On this new layer I added a
blur of about 7 and played around with the blending modes before
eventually settling on Screen. Let’s mess with some photo filters next. I decided I
liked Sepia, but also wanted to tone down the saturation a bit. Just for kicks I
added another Sepia layer at a lower density and set it on Screen Mode just
to see what would happen as well as lowered the opacity down to tone down
the effect. Wanting more of that glowy effect I duplicated the blurred layer
and brought it up to the top and lowered the opacity. Then I played around with
the brightness and contrast to bring back some more detail before also
playing around with the Curves adjustment layer which I then moved to
sit above the background layer. I’m pretty satisfied with this so I’m gonna
call it done. If you tried this on your own let me know how it went in the comments. Alright you made it this far now let’s
talk about that Subscriber Giveaway I promised. So this year I made the goal to
be more consistent with my videos and decided to motivate myself by setting
the goal to reach 500 subscribers by the end of the year. When I reach 500
subscribers I will choose one at random and ship them one graphic t-shirt, (Like
these!) of their choice from my TeePublic store for free, which you can check out
the link in the description along with the official contest rules. Now it’s
almost time to bid you all farewell but before I end this video I’d like to
feature this piece from RavenCorona. Check her out on Instagram @RavenCorona. I’m
especially fond of her dragon drawings, they’re pretty awesome.
If you’d like a chance for your art to be featured in my next video shoot me a
message on social media. All my links are down in the description below. Thank you
all for watching I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Go ahead and check out
these other videos to your left, you know you want to. Hey, you might as well
subscribe while you’re at it. New videos are on their way and you don’t want
to miss them do you? Of course not! Just click on my face to the right to
subscribe. Again thank you all for watching, BYEEEE!

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