How can Museums use Artificial Intelligence?

How can Museums use Artificial Intelligence?


So I think one of the really
interesting things around A.I. is there’s definitely this
moment of hype but actually when you talk
to members of the public what they’re unaware of
is they’ve been using artificial intelligence
technologies in their everyday life
for a long time now. So I think artificial intelligence, there is no one
single definition. A lot of the time when we
talk about artificial intelligence we’re actually talking
about Big Data or data processing modelling. If we think back to the early
concept of what a computer is, a computer was a human who entered data
and processed data, and humans are still
very much linked to artificial intelligence. A good example one of
our partners gave was the machine tagged a painting
as having an old lady. The person in the painting
was actually thirty-nine. The person who presented this
case study was the same age and said “well actually, I wouldn’t
consider that to be old.” Introducing a critical
language around A.I. is making members
of the public start to consider
what data they give to some of these
big tech companies. So actually we’re
starting to question, well, who’s programming
the machines? And who’s authenticating
what the machines are creating? So the network came
together to develop a series of small
working groups that provide the platform
for museum professionals to get together and talk about
the challenges they are facing when it comes to
using A.I. but also to share some
examples of good practice. Museums are really
interested in A.I. for two main reasons. A.I. allows them to
better understand their visitors, and creates new opportunities
to develop programmes that are more in tune
to what their visitors want and what might attract
potential new visitors. One of the main outcomes
of the network is going to be a toolkit for
musuem practicioners Our case studies are
going to really kind of peel back the layers to
how much did it cost, how long did it take
to implement, what skills are needed
to make this work? But we’re also interested in A.I.
from a collections focus. If you think, a lot of
museum collections is somebody travelled the world
a hundred years ago and emptied their suitcase. That probably wasn’t
documented that well; so we don’t know
where it came from, we don’t know what it is, we don’t know how old it is. A.I. allows us to
start to unpack some of those
undocumented objects. It’s never going to be
as good as a curator but it’s faster, it’s quicker,
and it’s cheaper. So one of the conversations
we’ve been looking at is this idea of is it better to have content
that’s not quite perfect but adds to the conversation than have no content at all. Museums provide a really
good platform for debate. For our public events at
the Barbican Centre we had a series of experts
sitting around a table and what we found
was members of the public quite enjoyed being
able to ask questions, to unpick some
of the headlines that they’ve seen about
these technologies, and ask “well what
does this mean for me?”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *