Boosting resilience for young people: resilient therapy

Boosting resilience for young people: resilient therapy


My name is Angie Hart. I work at the University of
Brighton. We’ve put together something that we’ve called Resilient Therapy. This is
basically a toolkit for parents, practitioners and young people to use.
We’ve plundered the academic evidence base for all the research on what
supports young people to do better than you’d think they would do given their
circumstances – all these social scientific articles and books that we’ve trawled
through and we’ve put together with our practice experience in one A4 sheet, and they can
use that as a framework to really think about what they might do to make what we call
a resilient move in a young person’s life. Karin is a parent of three young people
with special needs. She’s been involved in our Resilient Therapy
community and practice for years now and she’s training other parents in
the approach herself. What’s really great with the book that’s been
done for parents is that it’s full of lots of easy-to-use practical strategies.
I work with about an average of six different parents each week, and you know,
you really start to see results quite quickly. Lisa is a young person with lots of experience
of mental health services. She’s written a book for parents on the Resilient
Therapy approach. We’ve supported her to do that, and she’s done it with other young people
with similar experiences to her. When I first started working on the book
with them, the University, I was in quite a bad place. I was self-harming
quite a lot and I was severely depressed and I wasn’t too sure about Resilient Therapy,
but slowly as we worked with the university I realized it was quite appropriate and
it was something that I’d already been doing. And I realized that I was actually quite resilient
as a person. I think the Resilient Therapy work really is bringing
out what young people, many young people, the resources they’ve got inside them anyway
– they’ve just got a bit buried. And by having exposure to the framework, having a bit
of space to reflect, they can think themselves about the kind of resilient
moves they might make and parents and practitioners supporting
them can do the same.

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