Art Museums at Your Fingertips

Art Museums at Your Fingertips


CLAIRE: Thank you
for joining us for Art Museums at Your Fingertips. We are really excited to share
museum resources from a range of institutions. We’ll start by just
a couple of brief introductions from the various institutions
represented. And Georgina, I’m going to
go ahead and put you on first, if you want to say
a quick hello. GEORGINA: We’re on?
Great. CLAIRE: Georgina, you’re on. GEORGINA: Hi, everybody. it’s very cold in Chicago,
so this is a brilliant idea. I’m excited to share
our resources with you today. CLAIRE: Wonderful, thanks. Next we have Lisa Mazzola. Hi, everybody–
great to be here. I’m excited to share as well,
and hear from my colleagues. CLAIRE: Fantastic. And then next up we have
Susanna. (no audio) So Susanna, I think
you’re frozen for a bit, so we’ll come back to you. But Susanna’s joining us from
the National Gallery of Art. And so we’ll hear from her
just a little bit later. So we will go ahead
and walk through an overview of what to expect
during the next hour. And I’ll just say
a quick hello, so you can get a visual here. My name is Claire Moore,
and I’m joining you from The Metropolitan Museum of Art
here in New York. And over the next hour,
we will take a look at some of the many online
resources available at each of the institutions,
spending about ten minutes per institution. And during that time,
we will just walk through some of the resources. But I wanted to preface
the discussion by sharing that we will have
a link to the presentation for you at the end,
so not to worry about jotting down all the URLs
and things like that, that we will have that
available for you, and that I will be using
the question and answer feature as a way to kind of timestamp
the various presentations, so when you go back and you
just want to take a look at one section, then you can
do that very easily. But feel free to add questions
using the Q&A tool at any time, and we have some time set aside
at the very end to follow up on any questions
that we haven’t answered. So with that, I’m going to
turn it back to Susanna. We’ll see if we can get her
here, and then we will revise our sequence as needed
if she has trouble coming through. Okay, hi, everybody. Sorry I just kind of blipped out
the second that Claire said my name, but I’m
Susanna Fields-Kuehl, and I work at
the National Gallery of Art. And I manage our
online presence here. So I would just like to share
some of our resources that we have. So if you go to our home page–
this is the home page of the National Gallery of Art–
and under Education I’m going to walk you through
learning resources, which is basically where
we house hundreds of resources both through our free loan
program as well as online. So there’s a number
of different ways that you can access our resources. We have a comprehensive
database. So you could either go
straight into our catalog and begin searching,
either by typing in a keyword, an artist, an art movement,
for example, impressionism, or you can also search
by format. So one of the formats that we
have are teaching packets. And these are basically…
they’re extensive resources that you can borrow,
free of charge, and they cover a variety
of time periods and subjects. And they largely are culled
from works in our collection, but sometimes we also have
ones that are in conjunction with special exhibitions
we’ve had at the gallery. So, for instance, here’s one
of our teaching packets. And they often come with
a subject overview book– background information about,
you know, whatever the subject might be. And in addition we also
have classroom guides with ideas for activities
to do in the classroom. And oftentimes we also have
study prints that you could use in your classroom as well as
image CDs and slide sets. So many of these are available
for immediate download, which you can find
right over here. Or, if you prefer, you can
borrow them as well. Soon all of our teaching packets
will be available for download in PDF form. So another resource that we have
are videos in the form of DVDs, and we even still have some VHS. And these are again pulled from
our permanent collection, or, for instance,
special exhibitions. And these normally are
surrounded… we have some compilation DVDs
that might have a survey of a compilation
around a theme. And these, again, a lot of them
you could actually preview beforehand in the form
of a video podcast. Or, if you like,
you can borrow them. So I wanted to tell you
just a little bit about our free loan resource program. Say you wanted to borrow
this particular DVD. You would click on this link,
and it’s going to signal for you to enter your ID and last name. If you’re already a member,
you probably know about this. But if not you can just
set up an account with us. It’s very straightforward–
just, you know, some basic information
so that we can contact you and send you your materials. We don’t require a credit card, because obviously all of these
resources are free. So we would fill out
this registration form, and within two business days,
we’ll send you your user ID, and then you can
begin borrowing. There’s no limit
to the number of resources that you can borrow,
but we do request that you give us
one month notice. Typically you can have
DVDs for up to two weeks. And some of our teaching package
you can actually have for up to nine months–
so you could have for the whole school year. And then all
you would have to do is return them to us
by the due date, and you would have to pay
the media mail rate to ship it back to us,
but it’s very affordable. And if you have more questions
about the borrowing process, right under “more information”
there’s a link on how to borrow. So that is our
loan resource program. And I’d like to walk you
through a couple of our online offerings. So if you go up to education,
under Teachers, we have our onsite programs
that we offer. But since I’m sure a lot of you
are joining us across the nation,
these are some other online things that
you can access right away. So we have lessons
and activities. And these tend to be
organized around a given unit that typically have about
four to six lessons within them. So then each lesson
is focused around one particular work of art that falls
under a theme. And we have organized them
by grade level. And each lesson, they’re all
set up the same way. They’re linked to
NAEA standards. We’re currently working on
aligning these with the Common Core. And then, you know, you have
all the background information you would need, in addition,
some guided practice questions to facilitate discussion
with your students as well as activities and even an extension
activity, so they could, you know, really take the lesson
beyond the classroom. And then another
really wonderful resource to be aware of that I’ve tried
to link to is NGA Images. And, oop, it looks like
it may have taken me out of that window. But basically NGA Images
is a wonderful database that has over 32,000
high-resolution images that you can download
from our collection for free. If you want to download
a super-high resolution, you’d have to sign up
for an account. But it’s very simple,
much like the borrowing process. So that’s a really wonderful way
to bring works from the collection
into your classroom if you’re unable to come
to the museum, because you can really
get in up close to the brush strokes
and really analyze the way that some of these
works of art were created. And then coming up soon,
something I’m working on are more lessons that are
going to actually embed videos with footage from locations
where artists have created, which will be
a really wonderful tie-in, as well as demonstration
videos of how different artists have painted. And then, just to finish up,
I wanted to show one last resource available
to you, which is NGA Kids. If you’re not familiar with it,
it’s a wonderful resource that again uses works
from the collection. And students can create
their own works of art using these different
interactive games. They’re really
quite a lot of fun. And there’s, again,
multiple ways that you can access these. Of course they’re available
online. If you do play them online,
I just want to note that you have to download
the Shockwave player plug-in, which is a free plug-in. Or, if you prefer,
you can download it straight to your Mac computer. Or if you’re having issues
with internet connectivity, We also offer these on CDs
that you can order through our free loan program. So those are the resources I’d
like to share with you today. And if… obviously we’ll have
a question and answer session at the end of this,
but if you have any questions, you can also contact me
at [email protected] So thank you very much. Thanks so much, Susanna. That was a great overview,
and lots to go back and spend more time with. So next up, we have
Lisa Mazzola from MOMA. Hi, everybody. So I am going to try
to screen share for you. And I’m very excited
to share with you our resources. And I’m going to start with
our mobile learning site. Let’s see how this goes. So can everyone see…
my colleagues, can you see my screen share? CLAIRE: Yes, it’s
coming through. LISA: Great, awesome. Okay, and I’m just
going to do one more thing, and see if you guys
can see it okay, because I’m not seeing it
on my end. So I’m going to click on “What is Modern Art?” Can you guys see that okay? CLAIRE: Yes. LISA: Okay, great. All right, so I’m
covering you guys up. So I’m going to go back
to the homepage, and I’m going to start
telling you about this resource, which I’m very excited
to have the opportunity to share with you. We here in school
and teacher programs at the Museum of Modern Art
serve 35 students and 3,000 teachers annually
through onsite programs at MOMA. But we understand that not
everyone can come to the physical museum, so we’re
continually experimenting with digital forms of outreach,
engagement, and interpretation. MOMA Learning is
one such project. So we actually launched
this site a year ago. And I want to just give you
a little bit of back story about the site, so you kind of
understand our rationale and hopefully understand
the resources even better. So the principles behind
MOMA Learning are largely in line with those
that drive our onsite school and teacher programs,
in that we aim to provide teachers tools and techniques
that they can replicate with their students,
that the site integrates an inquiry-based approach
to learning about art, and that it emphasizes the
importance of connecting artworks to the students’
and the users’ own lives. It also approaches
works of art thematically, drawing together a narrative
rather than treating them in isolation. So to that point, the site
is construc… the content on the site, excuse me,
is structured around three basic building blocks–
artists, artworks, and themes. We’re able to draw
relationships between the artist, the artworks,
and the themes through the authoring tool,
which is actually a WordPress site. So the modularity
of the site ensures that we can give a more
dynamic and nuanced view of art history which goes
beyond a strictly linear or chronological approach. So one of the other things
that’s really great about the site is that
it showcases the abundance of media MOMA has produced
over the years, including interviews with
artists and curators, process videos, and even links
to archived public programs. So I’m just going to
start you of here by just showing you an example. I’m going to scroll around
this home page. So in the upper left corner
of the home page is just a short video
that I’m not going to play that you can watch that just
tells you a little bit about the site and about the
content that lives in the site. And then you’ll notice
as I’m hovering over the different themes
they highlight, and then below them
you’ll see subthemes. And the example here is
What is Modern Art? And you can see
the little description of what that theme is,
and what the themes are or the subthemes
that exist below that. If you go up into
the upper right corner here, this is a great place
for teachers to go. And I’ll talk about this
in a little bit, but it’s actually
our tools and tips section. You’ve got a resource
that’s sort of atomized sort of throughout the site. But we also have
one set location where you can find everything
that’s available in terms of video and
PowerPoints and worksheets that I’ll talk about later. We also have a really
wonderful blog that is actually content
from educators all across the Education Department
at the Museum of Modern Art. So it’s not just school and
teacher programs educators– it’s adult and academic, it’s interpretation
and research, and it’s a wealth of
information. Even guest bloggers,
artists that are working with our programs, whether it’s
teen programs or adult programs is just a couple of examples. I’m just going to scroll
down the page a little bit and just show you…
you’ll see some more themes. And then all the way
at the bottom here, we’ve got a section
that just tells you some of the most-viewed content
on the site. We’ve got a link to our
@MOMAlearning Twitter feed, which is a great resource
for content. We’ve actually got
18,000 people tweeting– a large amount of educators,
artists, just all sorts of people
interested in education and museums and art
tweeting about content, either their own content, or
sort of anything in the world. And then we have a flipper box
with a stream of all the photos of all our onsite programs. And that’s actually also
another contributory area from other folks
in the department. So I’m just going
to scroll up again, and take you through
one of the themes real quickly, to give you a sense of some
of the content on the site. And we do actually have
a MOMA website, MOMA.org, which is a wonderful resource,
and I’ll talk about that for just one or two minutes
at the end. But one of the things
that’s so great about this place or this site
that we’ve now created is it’s sort of a place
where we can aggregate all the wonderful content
that exists across the museum on websites, but also
sort of in people’s brains, and kind of put it
into one place. So you’ll see here that
this is the home theme page for What is Modern Art? If you go to the upper
right corner, always to that pink box,
you can always hit it to then see what available
downloads there are. And everything that we have,
whether it’s worksheets or PowerPoints,
are there for you to take. And, of course, they’re not
PDFs, so they’re unlocked. So we actually did that
very consciously, so that folks could actually
take the content that’s on the site
and integrate it and make it their own and change it
in any way. At any point, if you click on
one of these highlighted words, you’ll get the tool tip
for the glossary term, and you can always go
straight to the glossary. So that’s a great way
to just kind of include some new vocabulary
into your world. If you click on
any of these boxes here, you’re going to start to get
taken through the subtheme. So under What is Modern Art?
we have Painting Modern Life, Rise of the Modern City,
Modern Landscapes, Modern Portraits,
and Popular Culture. And so once you’re in
the subtheme, if you just scroll down,
you’ll see some more information about that particular subtheme, and you’ll see a carousel
of images for that theme. So we’ve got Cezanne’s
“The Bather.” We’ve also got still life. We can click on any of them
further and go to the deepest level of the site,
which is to the object page. So here we are at Cezanne’s
“The Bather.” And what you’ll see here
is an option to kind of scroll down, and what we’ve got
is in this sort of “know more” section,
we’ve got the content here about the object that I’m
hovering over with my cursor, and then to the left
we’ve got an example of some of the amazing
new content we can kind of aggregate
together, and it’s the photograph that was
the study/inspiration for Cezanne’s “The Bather.” If you go further down the page,
we get to the Fun Fact section. So whenever we know something
really interesting that maybe doesn’t sort of fit in
with this larger description, we always include
any sort of fun facts. And then if you scroll
further down the page, you’ll get to
the multimedia section. In this case we have
two audio segments about “The Bather,”
and then here we’ve got a Related Links section
that will even take you to… in this case, it happens to be
a MOMA link, which is to other examples
of “The Bather” in MOMA’s collection. But this could easily
be a link to any of, you know, other great museum websites,
or blogs, or anything like that. So for us, the Related Link
section is a great place where we can suggest resources
for further exploration, including, like I said,
exceptional content from other websites–
things like Art21, UbuWeb, and other museums. So I’m just going to
take you back up here for a second, and I’m going to
take you back a page to the subtheme page,
to Painting Modern Life, and then remind you again, to show you some of
the content here, we also have questions
and activities. So anything that’s included
in these boxes are further sort of follow-up
discussion questions that we recommend. There’s also examples
of different activities that you can do with your
students, like, for example, exploring perspectives
through photography. If you scroll down again
on this page, you’ll see again
the Related Link section. This time it’s an interview
with a curator. And then if we have something
in the MOMA store that actually relates
to that object, we’ll include that as well. If I go back up
to the right corner, to the Tools and Tips section,
I can just hover over that, and I can see that all
the questions and activates are also available
in these worksheets. I can also click
the More button– whoops, sorry, temperamental– and be taken to the global
Tools and Tips page. So this is where we aggregate
all of the worksheets that exist all across the site–
all the worksheets, all the PowerPoints. And I’m not going
to play them now, because I don’t want to take up
too much bandwidth. But then you’ll also notice
in this right column, we have a series,
an ongoing series, of educator videos
where MOMA educators talk about works of art
in a collection, talk about working with
students, talk about the themes
they like to use, and what the students’ responses
are to the works of art. So these videos also exist
in other places on the site, but you can always find them
here on the Tools and Tips page. So the last thing that
I’m going to do, because I think I might be
running out of time, is I’m just going to quickly
show you as well– and please do, obviously,
spend much more time on this site– I’m also going
to connect you to this area in the site, which is the
Collection area of MOMA.org. So at any point you can
use this toolbar here and you can bring yourself
to sections of MOMA.org. So you can always filter
a selection of works in MOMA’s collection by
whatever search criteria you want– it could be on view,
it could be painting and sculpture,
it could be 1940s. And then you can search
this way as well. so we also have object pages
that exist within MOMA.org. There’s also content
on these pages. The content on MOMA Learning
is a bit written more for anyone– for teachers,
for students, for informal learners. This kind of publication text
is a little bit more scholarly, so just know that it’s written
in a slightly different voice. You have the save feature
that you can do with any pages, and you can make a little file
cabinet for yourself as well, of different works of art. And then the last thing
that I want to show is just quickly the
Art Exhibition page. And Art Exhibitions. And the reason that I just
show you the Exhibitions page is, for example, if you
hit something like Isa Genzken, which is a new exhibition,
if there’s any kind of website that was created around
that exhibition, there will always be a link
for it. And within artists
or exhibition sites for your subsites
for MOMA exhibitions, there’s always an opportunity
for content that lives on these sites
as well. So that’s something that I
always like to point people to. So MOMA Learning,
the online collection, and also the exhibition pages
on MOMA.org. So these are all
really great places to go. So I welcome all of you
to continue to, if you have… or start, if you haven’t
already, to explore the site, and, you know, let us know
through the various social media channels. And you’ll see that in the PDF
that you’re going to get, all the URL and
various information. But we’d love to hear
what you think about the site. So thank you very much. CLAIRE: Thanks so much, Lisa. So many great resources. I know I’ve watched those
teaching videos, and they are really fabulous. So lots to see. So next up we’ll be
sharing resources from The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, and in the true spirit of
collaboration, Susanna is actually going
to screen share on my behalf, since I’m having a bug here
on my system. So thank you, Susanna. I’m going to go ahead
and put your screen up now, so you can share the media. The screen share’s
having an issue, so maybe I will just leave
for a second, okay? We’ll try again. No problem– thanks everyone
for bearing with us. Maybe in the interim, Lisa,
if your screen share is still up and working,
you could try just sharing the web page, and we
could move forward that way. And if Susanna pops back on
and can share, that’s fine, too. Oh, Susanna was really quick. So we’ll give it a shot
and see if you’re able to screen share, and if not,
we can see it… oh, perfect. SUSANNA: We’re good. CLAIRE: I’m going
to turn it over. Thanks, everyone, and apologies
for the delay. So this is The
Metropolitan Museum of Art. We’re located in New York City. This is the view you might see
as you were coming up the drive here. So we’ll go to the next slide,
Susanna. And The Metropolitan Museum’s
collection, it really spans
across the globe. And next slide. And ranging from ancient
to contemporary, so a broad gamut– both you can
time travel and globe trot all in one space. So go to the next slide. So I want to start here
on the museum’s home page. If you are on MetMuseum.org,
this is the page you’ll come to. And I’ll start by taking a look
under the Learn area. so we’ll go to the next slide. Thanks so much, Susanna,
for being my fingers here. So would just go to Learn,
hover over that, and go to the Educator tab. So we’ll move right along. Perfect. And that will take you
to the For Educator page. From the Educator page,
you can find out about upcoming programs for educators,
both online and on site. You can register
for school visits. And there at the very bottom,
there’s a link to a resource finder. So we’re going to focus
our attention there. And we’ll go to the next slide
to take a closer look. So this is a Find an Educator
resource. You can find two different
types of resources using this tool. One is lesson plans, and the
other is curriculum resources. And we’ll take a closer look
at each of those items. But while we’re on this main
navigation page, I just wanted to point out
a couple of different ways that you can navigate and
kind of filter your results. So what we’re looking at here
is the timeline view. So you can search by
kind of moment in time. And when you hover over
each of the images, you will see what resources
are available for that work of art. You’ll notice there’s also
a tab that says Maps, so you can also look at
a map view of the world, and kind of pin down
the geographic area you’re interested
in focusing on, and then find out more
about the works of art and related resources
we have. Across the top,
there’s various facets which you can use
to refine your search. So we have Subject Area,
Grade, Collection Area, and Theme. And those are items
that you can build on top of one another. So you could say you are
a social studies teacher, you work in high school,
and you want to focus on American art, for example. And so it would narrow
your results down accordingly. So this is a resource
that launched in the fall, and it’s something we’ll
continue to build. And we’re really excited
about sharing teacher-generated resources. So if you find that you use
a work of art from The Met’s collection,
and it goes really well, we’d love to hear about it. And you can find
our contact information on the resources
for the presentation. So please do be in touch, and
we’re always adding new items. So Susanna, if you could
take us to the next slide. Perfect. So for each of the lesson plans,
they focus on one work of art. It includes scrolls,
questions for viewing, the suggested grade
and subject area, as well as activity ideas,
which might range from writing activities to drawing
activities and so forth. And all of the lessons
include both national learning standards as well as Common Core
state standards, in addition to links
to related resources you can use to learn more
about the work of art. We’ll go to our next slide. Thank you, Susanna. Next is Curriculum Resources. These are really in-depth
resources that we have available
for teachers. They’re largely in-depth
informational texts about a moment in time,
an artistic process, and for the most part,
are organized by geographic location
or collection area. They… within them, you can
find things like timelines, maps, detailed descriptions
of individual works of art, as well as lesson plans. And those are available
to order. If you want a hard copy,
you can do that. But most of them are actually
available for free right on our website,
on the Curriculum Resource page. So you can download them
as a PDF. So we’ll go to our next slide. So back on our main page,
another area where you can… that you can use to find
information about works of art in The Met’s collection
is the Collections page. So we’ll go ahead
to advance a slide. And on the Collections place,
this is a page where it’s for general public, so
anyone looking for information about a work of art
in the collection, or trying to narrow down
to find a work of art that might be useful. You can use different facets
like who, what, when, and where as ways to narrow down
search results. And you can also put in
about midway through on the screen under…
there’s an opening for you to type in search terms. So it might be the name
of an artist. It could be the title
of a work of art. So any piece of information
you have, if you already have
a work of art in mind. And we’ll just walk through
an example of some of the things you might find using this tool. Let’s go to the next slide,
please. So this is an example. I put in the search term, “Washington Crossing
the Delaware”– a title of one of the paintings
in our collection. You’ll notice that several
different images appeared. And if you scroll down
this page, if you were on our website, you would find many
different options. These options you’ll notice…
about midway in the screen you can see an option to show
only artworks on display. So that would be especially
useful if you were planning a trip to the museum
with your class– a box you would want to check. So each of these
thumbnail images you can click to find
more information about the featured
work of art. And we’ll go to the next slide. So if we clicked on
one of those thumbnails, it would take us to
the Object page. And that includes
the basic information like you might find on a label–
the artist, the materials it’s made out of, the date,
and so forth, as well as a description. And you’ll notice just below
you will see other views of the work of art. So you can see it in the context
of the gallery. In this case you can also
access a number of other images of details of the work of art. And further down on that page,
you can find links to other related resources. We’ll go to the next slide. One really useful thing
if you are not in the area and are thinking about
integrating a work from the collection in your
classroom teaching is the ability to download from
that Search the Collections page so just by clicking
under the image on that page, it’ll take you to this view
which you can use to zoom in and zoom out. It would be really great
if you have a smart board in your classroom. But even if you don’t,
in the lower right-hand corner, you’ll see an arrow
pointing down. And that’s a link you can
click on to actually download a high resolution copy
of the image. So you could incorporate that
in an activity sheet, you could make a color copy
to use to pass out in your class. So any number of ways
that you might use that image in your teaching. Of course, a PowerPoint. We’ll go to the next slide. Another area of our website–
so we’re back on the main page– that might be useful for you is
if you hover over Collections, and then go to the tab Heilbrunn Timeline
of Art History, you’ll find another resource. And we’ll go to our next slide. This is essentially
the history of art told through The Metropolitan
Museum of Art’s collection. And you will find various
facets across the top that can help you kind of
filter the results. So you could click on
the World Maps tab to view a map of the world,
and click on the area you’re interested in
learning more about. You could also go to
a timeline view as a way to filter
your search results. And one thing I…
particularly useful, thinking about the emphasis on
informational texts and in Common Core state standards
are the thematic essays. So I’m going to share
one example of a thematic essay on the next slide. Great. So you can sort thematic essays
by collection area. You’ll notice on the right-hand
side of your screen there is different categories. So here we’re looking at essays
that relate to Egyptian art. And you’ll see there’s a range
of titles. Sometimes they focus
on a given moment in time, sometimes it’s on an
individual artist or a style. And this one is on Egypt
in the Middle Kingdom. So let’s go to the next slide
to take a closer look at what you might find
in these essays. Great. So across the top you’ll see
thumbnail images of a range of works
from The Met’s collection that relate to the topic
of the essay. Each of those you can click on
for more information. And below you’ll find
an informational essay about that topic. These range from about
a page to a page and a half when you print them out,
and they’re written by experts in the field. Sometimes it’s curators
here at the museum. Sometimes it’s historians
or other outside experts. So the range of reading level
would vary, but I would say, you know, for upper level
students in high school, this could certainly be
something that you integrate in your teaching directly. And for those of you who work
with younger grades, it could be a great place
to start, just to get an introduction or foundation
if you’re teaching a new area or new topic you haven’t
spent much time with. So we’ll go to our next slide. So back on the Collection,
the museum’s main page, one last resource
I wanted to share with you is 82nd and 5th. So again, you go to Collections,
hover over 82nd and 5th, and we’ll go to the next slide. You will find a menu
of different options. This is essentially in-depth…
well, detailed, I would say, videos about individual
works of art. they’re fairly short–
five minutes or less. And they are by curators
talking about a work of art. And we’ll go to the next slide. So you can just see, if you hover over
the different curators, you can see this is essentially just a hover-over
of that same screen, so the curator’s kind
of the voice behind the video recording. So these are great if you’re
really interested in integrating multiple information sources, and wanted to fold in a video
into your teaching. And there is a range
of collection objects. In all there’ll be
a hundred episodes. So I believe that
is the last slide, but we’ll just double check. Perfect. Thank you, Susanna,
for being our guide there. So it looks like Georgina
has momentarily lost connection, but I bet she will return
shortly. So maybe we could take
a moment while we’re waiting for Georgina to return
to just answer and field some of the questions
that have come up in the question and answer area. And feel free if you haven’t…
oh, Georgina’s back. So let me just say,
feel free if you haven’t added a question in the
question and answer section to add a question there,
or if there’s a question you really want to be sure
we get to and answer, to go ahead and plus-one it
by just clicking on it so that you can let us know
that that’s a real priority for you. So we’ll hold off that,
since it looks like Georgina is back,
and then circle back at the end to answer
some of those questions. I’m going to turn it over
to Georgina. And Georgina, Susanna
has graciously offered to also screen share
on your behalf, so she’ll walk through,
if you could just let her know when you’d like to
advance the slide. GEORGINA: Great, thanks. I’ve had a long delay here,
so I hope it’s not going to be too distracting. I’m Georgina Valverde. I’m the Assistant Director
of Teacher Programs. And my email address is right
there on the presentation, so that you may contact me with
any questions after the… today’s hangout. So Susanna, can we turn
to the first slide? The next slide. I think that’s the delay
I was talking about, maybe. Are you able to click
to the next slide? CLAIRE: All right, it looks like
Susanna’s rejoining. So thanks, everybody,
for your patience. So Susanna, it looks like
it is still on that first slide. I don’t know if you want to
try one more time advancing. Okay, well, maybe
Lisa can join in… (crashing sound) …a live web tour. And you could direct her
to the page. I bet Susanna will be
right back, yes. GEORGINA: Okay. Thanks, Susanna. SUSANNA: Maybe… okay. So while we’re
working this out, I… I’ll just tell you that
I’m going to share two different features
of our website. Our resources are
increasingly online. We do have a physical space
at the museum, the Educator Resource Center,
so if you are in Chicago, please come and visit us. There’s a lot of
great stuff there. Videos, reference books,
and kits from different museums around
the United States. You know, especially resources
that we’ve produced. So I think we’re still
trying to work this out. But maybe I’ll…
(laughs) CLAIRE: Oh, here’s
Susanna again. SUSANNA: Hopefully
it sticks. (laughs) It keeps bumping me out–
I am so sorry. Okay. Great, so let’s go
for the first slide. The next one, yeah, there we go,
which is the landing page for The Art Institute
of Chicago. And as you can see, I hovered
over the Collections tab on the left hand side
of the screen. And this is one place
where you can begin to access information
about works of art and resources that are
associated with them. If we click to the next slide, then we are in
the Collections page, and it’s very similar
to The Met in terms of, you know, we’re an encyclopedic
museum, so our collection encompasses works
from all over the world. You can explore the collection
using the different features on this page. On the left hand side, you can
access it alphabetically. You can access it by
the specific collection. You can hover over the icons,
the images right on the top, or you can do a quick search, which I’ve already
typed in Monet. It’s not case sensitive,
so you can do it by keyword, you can do it by artist, or there’s more
advanced features. I’m not going to show you
those right now, but feel free to explore. You can use accession number,
et cetera. So if you move on
to the next slide, I’m showing you…
did we lose Susanna? Well, let’s just imagine, then,
that we’ve clicked on Search Monet, and then it’s
going to pull up a number of different resources. These are in conversation
with our… Susanna, when you’re ready, if you can click
to the next slide… We are looking at the results
of a search on Monet. So, anyhow, so it will be,
you know, different interpretive resources–
information about everything that, you know, is online
and available for that particular artist. And once we get back
with the view, we’ll see that it also… the Collections page
filters by categories. And so you’re able to refine
that search and choose… for example, I think for
the purposes of teachers, we would want to…
there we go. I’ve already gone ahead
and clicked on Interpretive Resources,
and that narrows down the search to everything that comes with
a resource associated with it. So, yeah, we can stay on
this page. I’ve… I believe that this is
Monet’s “Stacks of Wheat.” And this is an artwork, and it
has the basic information, such as the date
and the medium and so forth. You can click on View
Enlargement, and that’s one way that you can download
a high-quality reproduction to use in your classroom
to print, you know, up to a fairly large format–
let’s say like 11×17… yeah, 11×17. But the other thing
that we can do here is that we can add it
to… we can start a collection of this…
of this artwork. Or a collection that includes
multiple artworks. What I’m going to do right now
is I want you to look at all the interpretive
resources that were pulled up when I did that search. and on the bottom,
I have selected the video, which is one of the things
that I’m going to add to the collection. So if we can move
to the next slide, and I think that we…
there we go. Thanks, Susanna. So that’s the video. And as you can see
on the left-hand side, we have a window that allows you
to create an account, a username and password. And with this presentation,
I’ve logged in to my collection, and I’m going to show you
how you can organize these resources online. So let’s move to the next slide,
and that is the view of… sorry, actually this is…
this is scrolling down from that particular resource
and showing you other resources that are associated with them. But if you notice,
at the bottom, it also gives you another choice
or another way to access the collections. And since I’ve already logged
in, and I’ve typed “Impressionism”, I have a whole
suitcase, if you will, with those resources. And I can click Update
and it will add it to my collection online. So let’s go to the next slide. And that will show you a view
of that particular collection titled Impressionism. But the online feature
allows you to keep multiple collections,
and to organize them according to sequences
that you choose. If you see there’s a little
arrow there that allows you to move the resource up or down. Let’s say that you are
coming to the museum. You would want… you could
use this feature as a way to organize a field trip
and have the objects organized in a way that…
in the sequence that you will visit in the galleries. Let’s move to the next slide. So I want to show you
another way that you can access resources and work with
this feature of collections, making collections. If you hover over Learn,
you’ll see that there are different categories
that pop up. We’re going to click on
For Teachers Pre K-12. So we can move
to the next slide, please. And that’ll get us
on the landing page for teacher resources. On the top you see
information for student tours, so feel free to explore that. But I’m going to concentrate
on what’s available here for teachers. We have… you can peruse
our teacher programs, access a calendar of our
workshops that are upcoming, you can… and the tool
that I want to point your attention to
is the educator resource finder. So that’s the third one down
from teachers pre-K through 12. And so we’re going to go
to the next slide, and that’s going
to land us on the Educator Resource Finder
page. This is a database that’s
also connected to collections, but that allows you
to search resources really based more on
curricular needs, grade levels. There was… it has that
cloud, or that tag cloud that lets you look at,
what are the resources that we have best represented
in the… in our collection. Impressionism is one of our
most important collections, so you can see that the…
the label there is quite… quite prominent. So I’ve done another search
on Monet. And so if you go
to the next slide, it’ll pull up the resources
associated with that. I do want to point
your attention to the left-hand side
on the top… the top left. You… this gives you a
different way to view resources by, let’s say, chunk category. So you can see all
the resources, or you can look at artwork
resource packets, which are, you know… we probably have a collection
of up to 40 of them. And these are single works
of art with a very extended
introduction, background information,
classroom activities, a glossary. These are all downloadable
PDFs, so I encourage you to explore that when you have
a leisurely time later on. We also have teacher manuals
that are very extensive. And so… and they represent
different areas of our collection. So, again, you know,
explore that… at websites, as well as the section
that tells you more about the
Educator Resource Finder. On the right hand,
you see also a filtering… you know, the filtering
capability. So you can choose…
you can narrow down your search by… let’s say by
grade level, or by subject area. I’ve chosen to actually
look at this work based on a lesson plan. So if you look at, again,
the right-hand side, and under… sorry, I… very small, and I’m trying
to find my own copy here. But what I’ve selected
is a lesson plan. So if we can move on
to the next slide, it’ll pull up that
particular resource. And, again, you can see
that there’s a PDF icon there that you can add it to. And I’ve already typed
in “Impressionism.” So again, even though
I’m accessing these resources from the Educator
Recourse Finder, it is linked to Collections, and
so that whether I search through the resource finder
or the Collections page, I’m able to keep
all my resources online, and next year when I’m planning
a lesson on Impressionism or Monet, I’ll be able
to access those… all those wonderful things
that I’ve collected. And I think we have
a couple more slides. Let’s go ahead and click
to the next one. That is coming back to,
again, the Collections. Notice that there’s a space
where you can add some notes, again, you know, that can
be useful when you come in on a field trip. You can also have different
icons on the top, so that you can share them
via social media, you can print them,
or you can also email a link of this collection
to your colleagues or your students. And with, perhaps, some prompts
or assignments included in that box. So I believe that is
all that I have. There’s one more slide,
and that just shows you… I think… I believe it’s
the last slide. It shows you the lesson. So, you know,
explore the resources, because there’s
different formats. We have a wealth of resources,
and we’re, you know… increasingly, you know,
we are offering them digitally, and we’re also
in the process of thinking about how to make them
a lot more accessible in terms of themes
and categories. And finally I’ll close
with the last slide, which shows you a view
of the multiple collections that are in my account,
for example. But it shows you that
there’s really, you know, endless space where you can
organize objects, both accessing through
the Resource Finder or the Collections page
of The Art Institute. I think I’ve covered everything. Thank you very much. Thanks so much
for sharing that. So we’ll go ahead and move
to the question section. And so feel free, if you haven’t
added a question, to go ahead and add one,
and we will go ahead and dive right into responding
to some of the questions that have been posted. So the first question I see
is any… someone asking if there’s any
plans to shift from borrowing physical media to making
these great resources available online
as videos or recordings. So feel free,
any of the facilitators, if you’d like to respond
to that, we can just take turns doing so. SUSANNA: Sure, I can take it. We’re always in the process
of reviewing the different formats we have. I mean, as I mentioned,
we still have VHS and slides, which some teachers
still do use. But we’re also trying
to expand our offerings. And as I mentioned, we are…
I’m actually currently working with a filmmaker
who has this wonderful footage of, for instance,
Monet’s water lily garden. And so we are thinking about
different ways of presenting the collection
so that you could actually see Monet’s water lily garden
as he painted it in conjunction with this video
of the actual landscape that he’s painting in. But yes, we are definitely
trying to shift things a little bit more to
an online experience, you know, even if it’s just,
as I mentioned, having teaching packets available
as a downloadable PDF instead of having
to borrow them. Same thing with, you know,
our DVDs. You know, our audio-visual
departments really have been boosting the number of video
podcasts that are available. So, again, we are trying
to be cognizant of keeping up with the times,
but also realizing that some teachers may not have
access to the newer media, so holding on to some of
the older formats as well. CLAIRE: Thanks, Susanna. Would anyone else
like to chime in about that particular question? I’ll go ahead and attempt. You know, we’re not there yet,
but I would say that we do have a great amount
of video lectures available, and you can access them both
through, again, the Collections page,
or the Educator Resource Finder. And generally with any…
especially if you do a search by artist,
it’ll pull up… because it’s in alphabetical
order, and the items are tagged, audio, for example,
it’ll pull up any audiovisual resources first. So there’s little clips,
there’s entire lectures by scholars that visit
the Art Institute that lecture here. There are more informal
type of videos that show conservation techniques,
or special issues related to special media. And also another great place
to look for those kind of more interactive devices
is on the Thematic website. So that’s accessible through
the Educator Resource Finder. CLAIRE: Thanks, Georgina. From the Metropolitan… From the Metropolitan
Museum of Art, we have shifted to at least PDFs, so you can
get digital versions for free of our teacher resources. And we’re seeing more and more
video all the time on our website,
so I would say 82nd and 5th is a great example. There’s also a series
called Connections, which is thematic
explorations of the collection through very personal lens
of different people from all different career areas
in the museum, from someone who works
in Visitor Services to a curator, to an educator,
and so forth. So themes really range widely. But that’s another
kind of video resource. And we’re certainly in the
process of developing more. So Lisa, did you want to say
anything about MOMA on that respect, or should we
go ahead and move to another question? I would just say we don’t
do any lending. I mean, pretty much everything
we have is now online, and we’re increasingly…
and I didn’t really show the range of everything
that’s on MOMA.org in addition to MOMA Learning. But I would also say that
there is tons of different media content
on MOMA.org. We also live stream
a lot of our adult programs. So most of our stuff…
I mean, obviously we have a library and an archives,
and we don’t have the entire library and archives digitized
and available online, but there’s tons of media
and images and, you know, information about the works
that already exist there. Thanks, Lisa. So it looks like we have time
for one more question. And several people were
interested in this question– what if art museums offered a
reflection or discussion lounge for educators to share ways in
which they could successfully incorporate
museum resources into their curriculum
for others to be inspired by and gather new ideas
from classroom tested and approved by teachers? So I’m curious about…
I can speak to The Met on that front about
some of the things we’re doing, and then I’d love to hear
from my colleagues about any related projects
they are working on. So at The Metropolitan Museum,
we’ve been working on really turnkeying some of
the great lessons that teachers who attend
our workshops are generating during those programs and
sharing the really best examples with a broader
group of teachers online, so that many of those lessons
that you see on our Lesson Resource Finder
come from teachers, active K-12 teachers
from a range of disciplines. In addition, we also host
an equivalent of that onsite during our annual open house
for educators. We started hosting a share fair. So teachers who come to programs
throughout the year, or brought their students
on a class visit, can come and present their ideas
to their peers with examples of student work. And my favorite was the time
when actually the teacher brought the students along, and they presented
what they did. So that was really fabulous. So that’s part of
every September, when we host our open house, a key component has become
our teacher share fair. And I’ll turn it over to others
who might want to share some other ideas. I love the question. I think that it’s…
it shows that teachers are thinking… I mean,
that people think faster than we can really serve them,
you know? But I think that increasingly
with online platforms, that is… you know, that’s
a really natural environment for people to come together
and exchange ideas, and I hope we are, you know,
all moving towards those capabilities. We also have a curriculum fair,
very similar to The Met. It culminates… you know,
it’s a culmination for our… for the school year, and it
features lessons developed around resources
or works of art. We also have a program called
Teachers Lounge. And one of the sessions
of Teachers Lounge is called Lessons in the Spotlight,
and we invite area educators. to come and share their lessons,
and, you know, it takes the form of kind of a critique,
so that they get feedback, and they’re able to
run it by their colleagues and get ideas and troubleshoot. LISA: I mean, one of the things
that I would say in terms of we… I also… I
think it’s a great question, and just a great idea. And we thought about,
when we launched MOMA Learning a year ago, trying to kind of
build that feature in somehow. And we didn’t end up necessarily
going into, you know, teachers contributing lessons, but often through our social
media channels, whether it’s Facebook
or Twitter, we like to invite teachers to share, and we
prompt them to do so there, and we always welcome
that kind of dialogue. So we try, through social media,
to always have that sort of lively discussion
about practice. And, you know,
one of the other things we’ve also been playing
with is just massive open online courses,
which is a whole other topic, but that’s a place where we have
had a lot of sharing. But your question/comment
is actually giving me great ideas for different
features of social media, different prompts we could do
moving forward that relate to the program. So I thank you for that comment, because I think that’s a
really… a really good one. CLAIRE: Thanks, Lisa. So it looks like we are
right at our end time, but I wanted to be sure
to share just next steps. We would really love to get everybody’s feedback
about the session today. I know for The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, and I think for several of the
institutions participating, this is a new format,
a new platform, for engaging with teachers, so we’re really keen to glean
your feedback about the session today
to really inform our decisions about programming
moving forward. I’ve posted on the event page
a link to a short evaluation, and those people who are
able to fill that out, we’ll enter you in a drawing
for a free curriculum resource from The Metropolitan
Museum of Art. And so we’d really love
your feedback. I also have posted there
on the event page a link to the presentation
for the session today, so you can view all of the
resources that were shared and go back and take your time,
or even go share that with others at your school. And after the session, the full recording will be
available for you to go back, and you could replay
if you missed a part, or joined us late, or just want to forward
the link to a colleague. So thank you so much
for joining us. We’re really excited
to connect with you. And I want to thank
my fantastic colleagues who really have been
a great team to collaborate with and troubleshoot during
the session today. So thank you so much everybody. ALL: Thank you, Claire. Oh, thank you. CLAIRE: And for those
participating, feel free to add any additional comments
or questions there on the event page,
and we’ll keep an eye on that. So thank you so much.

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